Nation

Del. courthouse gunman was ex-father-in-law

WILMINGTON, Del. — A 68-year-old man whose son was engaged in a bitter custody battle was identified Tuesday as the gunman who opened fire in a Delaware courthouse lobby, killing his former daughter-in-law and another woman. The gunman also died after exchanging fire with officers.

Delaware State Police said Thomas Matusiewicz of Edcouch, Texas, shot Christine Belford, 39, and her friend Laura Mulford, 47, on Monday. Two police hit by gunfire were protected by their armored vests.

Advertisement

Investigators were awaiting autopsy results Tuesday to determine whether Matusiewicz was killed by police or shot himself with his .45-caliber semiautomatic handgun.

State Police homicide detectives continued interviewing witnesses, viewing surveillance videos, and collecting evidence at the New Castle County Courthouse, which remained closed.

Get Breaking News in your inbox:
Find out about important news stories as soon as they break
Thank you for signing up! Sign up for more newsletters here

Authorities said Belford and Mulford, both from Newark, Del., were at the courthouse to attend a child support arrears hearing for Belford’s former husband, David Matusiewicz.

State Police spokesman Sergeant Paul Shavack said Matusiewicz, 45, was being questioned and was in custody on a federal probation issue.

Matusiewicz appeared in court Tuesday afternoon for an initial appearance on the government’s request to revoke his probation following his 2009 guilty plea to federal fraud and kidnapping charges. Matusiewicz was led into court wearing an orange prison jumpsuit with his hands cuffed behind his back.

Advertisement

Federal prosecutors say Matusiewicz sought permission on Jan. 8 to travel from Texas to Delaware and told officials he would be staying with an uncle in Bayville, N.J., but that he spent Sunday night, the night before the shooting, at a home in Elkton, Md.

Prosecutors also say Matusiewicz is behind on child support payments of $2,200 a month.

Associated Press

Loading comments...
You're reading  1 of 5 free articles.
Get UNLIMITED access for only 99¢ per week Subscribe Now >
You're reading1 of 5 free articles.Keep scrolling to see more articles recomended for you Subscribe now
We hope you've enjoyed your 5 free articles.
Continue reading by subscribing to Globe.com for just 99¢.
 Already a member? Log in Home
Subscriber Log In

We hope you've enjoyed your 5 free articles'

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Already a subscriber?
Your city. Your stories. Your Globe.
Yours FREE for two weeks.
Enjoy free unlimited access to Globe.com for the next two weeks.
Limited time only - No credit card required!
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.
Thanks & Welcome to Globe.com
You now have unlimited access for the next two weeks.
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.