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Mars rover turns 1, begins journey to explore mountain

Detours caused trek to be pushed back months

LOS ANGELES — Mount Sharp has beckoned Curiosity since the NASA rover made its grand entrance on Mars a year ago Monday, dangling from nylon cables to a safe landing.

If microbes ever existed on Mars, the mountain represents the best hope for preserving the chemical ingredients that are fundamental to all living things.

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After a poky but productive start, Curiosity recently pointed its wheels south, rolling toward the base of Mount Sharp in a journey that will last many months. Expect Curiosity to channel its inner tourist as it drives across the rock-strewn landscape, dodging bumps and taking in the scenery.

‘‘We do a lot of off-roading on a lot of little dirt roads,’’ said mission manager Jennifer Trosper.

Curiosity will unpack its toolkit once it arrives at its destination to hunt for the organic building blocks of life.

Scientists have been eager for a peek of Mount Sharp since Curiosity, the size of a small SUV, touched down in an ancient crater near the Martian equator on Aug. 5, 2012.

The world wondered whether Curiosity would nail its landing, which involved an acrobatic plunge through the thin atmosphere that ended with it being gently lowered to the ground with cables.

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Engineers had to invent new tricks since Curiosity was too massive to bounce to a landing cocooned in airbags — the preferred choice for previous rovers Spirit and Opportunity.

After seven terrifying minutes, a voice echoed through mission control at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. ‘‘Touchdown confirmed,’’ said engineer Allen Chen. ‘‘We’re safe on Mars.’’

Scientists and engineers clad in matching sky-blue polo shirts erupted in cheers. Some were so excited that they overshot their high-fives.

The technical prowess required to pull off such a landing has ‘‘captured the imagination of a whole new generation of prospective explorers,’’ said American University space policy professor Howard McCurdy, who has closely followed the $2.5 billion mission.

Once the euphoria of landing wore off, the six-wheel, nuclear-powered rover went to work, spending two months testing its instruments and systems. The health checks took longer than expected because Curiosity is a complex machine.

To celebrate the landing anniversary, engineers commanded one of Curiosity’s instruments to play ‘‘Happy Birthday’’ as the rover took a break.

Scientists initially hoped to head to Mount Sharp late last year, but decided to take a detour to an intriguing spot near the landing site where three types of terrain intersected.

Curiosity discovered rounded pebbles — clear evidence of an ancient streambed. It also fulfilled one of the mission’s main goals: By drilling into a rock and analyzing its chemistry, Curiosity concluded that Gale Crater possessed the right environmental conditions to support primitive life. The rover is not equipped to look for microbes, living or extinct.

With Curiosity busy studying rocks and dirt, the start date for the mountain trek kept getting pushed back. At one point, the team declined to predict anymore.

Now that it’s finally on the move, scientists hope to keep stops to a minimum. Along the way, Curiosity will take pictures, check the weather, track radiation, and fire its laser at rocks.

Curiosity was such a smash that NASA is preparing for an encore performance in 2021 using the same landing technology. Budget willing, the next rover will be able to collect rocks and store them on the Martian surface for a possible future mission to pick up and ferry back to Earth.

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