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Shirley Leung

Five memorable moments from the Boston Women’s March

Senator Elizabeth Warren incited a crowd of tens of thousands who gathered on Boston Common Saturday afternoon for the Women’s March.
Senator Elizabeth Warren incited a crowd of tens of thousands who gathered on Boston Common Saturday afternoon for the Women’s March.

Boston Common was the place to be on Saturday, where thousands gathered for the Boston Women’s March for America. Here are my takeaways:

Maybe Elizabeth Warren should have run for president after all.

As the US senator got ready to lead the march, the crowd shouted “2020” and whipped out their smartphones to get a photo. The senator — one of Donald Trump’s fiercest critics — was treated like a political rock star with female groupies begging for a wave and a smile. One young girl with a clever sign got lucky when Warren beckoned her over to cross the police line for a picture. Her sign read: “The Force is Female.”

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(Shirley Leung)

Barbara Lee, one of Hillary Clinton’s biggest donors, helped lead the Boston march.

We haven’t heard much from Lee since Clinton’s stunning loss in November. Lee, a Cambridge political activist and philanthropist, walked with the Massachusetts Women’s Political Caucus alongside Warren and Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey. Lee donned a vintage sash (circa 1915) that read “Votes for Women,” which was worn during the suffragist movement.

“This is the biggest march I can ever remember in Boston,” said Lee. “This march is a moment, but it is bigger than a moment. It is going to lead to an energized movement.”

Lee has spent much of her life trying to get more women into public office with the hope that one of them can become the first female president of the United States. Lee said she hasn’t given up.

“That’s absolutely going to happen,” she said.

Barbara Lee helped lead Boston Women's March for America alongside Attorney General Maura Healey and Senator Elizabeth Warren.
Barbara Lee helped lead Boston Women's March for America alongside Attorney General Maura Healey and Senator Elizabeth Warren. (John Tlumacki/Globe Staff)

Not officially an anti-Trump protest, but in practice it was.

Clearly, many of the marchers came to express their disappointment with the bombastic Republican and his policies that could hurt immigrants, the environment, reproductive rights, and health care access. The signs said it all: “Dump Trump,” “Dicktator,” “Trump Error — Jan. 20,” “Tweet this Trump . . . We will fight you . . . and we will prevail.”

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Anti-Trump signs were popular, including this one from a group of North Shore women.
Anti-Trump signs were popular, including this one from a group of North Shore women. (Shirley Leung/Globe Staff)

The Women’s March featured plenty of men.

It might have been billed the “Women’s March,” but there were scores of sons, fathers, husbands, and boyfriends. Quite a few men proudly wore pink “pussy hats” — the signature fashion statement of these demonstrations being held globally. The handmade knitted pink hat with cat ears is designed to remind people of’ Trump’s offensive use of the p-word on a hot mike.

Men accessorizing in “pussy hats.”
Men accessorizing in “pussy hats.”(SHIRLEY LEUNG/GLOBE STAFF)
This is what a male feminist looks like.
This is what a male feminist looks like.(Shirley Leung/Globe Staff)

Just a bunch of aging liberals demonstrating? Hardly, millennials and Generation Z were out in force.

In the sea of faces on the Boston Common, young women and girls were everywhere in groups or with their families. They carried homemade signs, they chanted, they cheered. March organizers hope they’ve energized a new group to get civically engaged, support female political candidates, or run for office.

(Shirley Leung/Globe Staff)

Shirley Leung is a Globe columnist. She can be reached at shirley.leung@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @leung.