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Sanders ahead of Clinton in Mass., poll finds

Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders (left) and Hillary Clinton spoke to supports in New Hampshire, earlier this month.
Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders (left) and Hillary Clinton spoke to supports in New Hampshire, earlier this month. Left: Keith Bedford/Globe Staff; Right:Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders holds a 7 percentage-point lead over Hillary Clinton in Massachusetts, a new poll by Public Policy Polling found, but it’s quite the opposite in 10 of the 12 other Super Tuesday primary states.

The survey, which found Sanders leading Clinton 49 percent to 42 percent among likely Democratic primary voters in Mass., was conducted using a combination of automated phone calls to landlines and online interviews of cell phone-only respondents.

Clinton is holding on to double-digit leads in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia, and a slim 2 point lead in Oklahoma, according to the survey.

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Sanders is also leading in Vermont, the senator’s home state, where he had a commanding 76 point lead over Clinton.

Clinton seems to be greatly benefiting from overwhelming support from African American voters, where she led Sanders in nine of the states surveyed that have more black voters than the national average. Overall, the poll found her support in the 12 states it surveyed is anywhere between 63 to 74 percent with African Americans, compared to Sanders’s 12 to 23 percent.

The poll found that Clinton also benefited when respondents in states other than Vermont were asked who they trust most to be commander in chief, and she likewise beat out Sanders on issues of women’s rights and race relations.

Senator Sanders, meanwhile, polled better on who respondents trusted most to crack down on Wall Street and who they have more faith in to pursue policies that would raise the incomes of average Americans.

The Massachusetts portion of the poll, conducted from Feb. 14 to 16, had a margin of error of 4.2 percent.

Read the full poll results here.


Rob DeCola can be reached at robert.decola@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @robdecola.

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