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    ‘Progressive pro-life’ Facebook post draws scrutiny

    Human rights attorney Lydia Edwards posted a comment on Facebook back in October that is getting extra scrutiny now that she’s running for state Senate.
    Barry Chin/Globe Staff
    Human rights attorney Lydia Edwards posted a comment on Facebook back in October that is getting extra scrutiny now that she’s running for state Senate.

    Human rights attorney Lydia Edwards posted a comment on Facebook back in October that is getting extra scrutiny now that she’s running for the state Senate seat vacated by Anthony Petruccelli of East Boston.

    Edwards, one of seven candidates for the seat that represents parts of Boston, Cambridge, Winthrop and Revere, described herself as “progressive pro-life” while responding to a thread about gun control. The subject of the post was that young men who buy guns should be subject to same rules, including parental permission and a mandatory 48-hour waiting period, as a young woman seeking an abortion.

    “THIS IS A GREAT IDEA,” Edwards wrote on Oct. 8. “I’m progressive pro-life (still working on the description) anyway too Catholic to be pro abortion but too educated to realize you can’t ban them.”

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    She also wrote that she was “pro life in the real sense of the word … no death penalty, no euthanasia, no war, etc.”

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    The post got the attention of the Planned Parenthood Advocacy Fund of Massachusetts, the political arm of the women’s healthcare provider. The group released a statement that said Edwards’s online post “contradicts the support she clearly articulated for safe, legal abortion” in the group’s candidate questionnaire.

    “We hope that Ms. Edwards will clarify her position so that the residents of that district who care deeply about this issue are able to make informed voting decisions when they head to the polls on April 12,” Jen Childs-Roshak, the group’s president, said in the statement.

    Edwards, however, said Wednesday that there’s nothing to clarify because her position hasn’t changed.

    Abortion is an “intimate decision” between a woman, her doctor, and “whatever God she prays to,” Edwards said. She added that because of her work advocating for immigrant domestic workers, Edwards says she has a clear understanding of the underlying economic pressure that poor, working-women face because of family-planning issues.

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    “Everyone who knows me knows my record. I’m pro-choice,” she said. “I don’t know how to be more clear than that.”

    And to underscore her support of Planned Parenthood, which provides affordable healthcare, Edwards said she’s a client as well. “I’m proud of the fact that I use Planned Parenthood’s services.”

    Akilah Johnson can be reached at akilah.johnson@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @akjohnson1922.