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Here’s why these Democratic women are wearing black to the State of the Union

House minority leader Nancy Pelosi (center) with other House members wearing black in support the #MeToo and “Times Up” movements ahead of tonight's State of the Union address.
House minority leader Nancy Pelosi (center) with other House members wearing black in support the #MeToo and “Times Up” movements ahead of tonight's State of the Union address.(Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Associated Press)

Dozens of female Democratic lawmakers are following the lead of celebrities at this year’s Golden Globe Awards by wearing black to the State of the Union.

On Tuesday afternoon, the female legislators gathered to take a photo of their black outfits adorned with pins to pay homage to the #MeToo and “Time’s Up” movements.

Allegations of sexual harassment have had a big effect on Capitol Hill in recent months, forcing resignations and retirements on both sides of the political aisle as well as ongoing Ethics Committee investigations.

House minority leader Nancy Pelosi tweeted that the nation must “recognize and cherish the brave people who stand up to demand their stories be heard.”

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Representative Katherine Clark of Massachusetts tweeted: “It’s time to address systemic inequality and injustices in the workplace that prevent women from reaching their full potential.”

Representative Niki Tsongas of Massachusetts said she stood in solidarity with those seeking a cultural shift.

More photos:

Democratic members of the House raised their fists.
Democratic members of the House raised their fists.(JIM LO SCALZO/EPA/Shutterstock)
Representatives Jan Schakowsky, Madeleine Bordallo, Susan Davis, and other House Democrats posed for photos.
Representatives Jan Schakowsky, Madeleine Bordallo, Susan Davis, and other House Democrats posed for photos.(Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester adjusted her “RECY” button. The buttons are a tribute to Recy Taylor, a black Alabama woman who was raped by six white men in 1944.
Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester adjusted her “RECY” button. The buttons are a tribute to Recy Taylor, a black Alabama woman who was raped by six white men in 1944.(Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Associated Press)