Politics

John Kerry says Trump’s Iran decision ‘breaks America’s word’

FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2017 file photo, U.S Secretary of State John Kerry speaks with the media after attending the Mideast peace conference in Paris, France. President Donald Trump is attacking John Kerry after reports that the former secretary of state has been quietly promoting the Iran nuclear deal. Trump says on Twitter Monday: "The United States does not need John Kerry's possibly illegal Shadow Diplomacy on the very badly negotiated Iran Deal. He was the one that created this MESS in the first place!" (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, Pool)
Alex Brandon/Associated press
John Kerry.

Former Secretary of State John Kerry did not hold back in his assessment of President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Iran nuclear agreement on Tuesday.

In a statement issued shortly after Trump’s White House appearance, Kerry said the decision to pull out of the deal negotiated by the Obama administration “breaks America’s word” and stymies the ability for the United States to make new agreements.

“No rhetoric is required. The facts speak for themselves,” Kerry said in the statement. “Instead of building on unprecedented nonproliferation verification measures, this decision risks throwing them away and dragging the world back to the brink we faced a few years ago.”

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The Globe reported over the weekend that Kerry has been engaged in a stealthy campaign to try and salvage the agreement, which was one of his signature accomplishments. Kerry met with a high-ranking Iranian official in recent weeks and has also spoken with European leaders, the Globe reported. Trump has blasted that effort in a series of tweets in recent days, calling it “possibly illegal.”

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Read Kerry’s full statement below:

“Today’s announcement weakens our security, breaks America’s word, isolates us from our European allies, puts Israel at greater risk, empowers Iran’s hardliners, and reduces our global leverage to address Tehran’s misbehavior, while damaging the ability of future Administrations to make international agreements. No rhetoric is required. The facts speak for themselves. Instead of building on unprecedented nonproliferation verification measures, this decision risks throwing them away and dragging the world back to the brink we faced a few years ago. The extent of the damage will depend on what Europe can do to hold the nuclear agreement together, and it will depend on Iran’s reaction. America should never have to outsource those stakes to any other country. This is not in America’s interests. We should all hope the world can preserve the nuclear agreement.”