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Here’s a look at the candidates on the Sept. 4 primary ballot, with biographies reported and compiled by Globe staff and correspondents. Candidates have also filled out a brief survey at our request.

Seventh Congressional District

Includes Chelsea, Everett, Randolph, Somerville, half of Cambridge and Milton, and about three-fourths of Boston.

Candidates:

Democrats

Michael Capuano.
Michael Capuano. (Jim Davis/Globe Staff)

Michael E. Capuano

Capuano, 66, has served as a representative since 1999. A graduate of Dartmouth College and Boston College Law School, Capuano began his political career in Somerville, where he was raised and now lives, running twice for mayor unsuccessfully in 1979 and 1981 before winning in 1989. He served in that role for 10 years before succeeding Joseph P. Kennedy II as the Eighth District’s representative. He now serves the Seventh District after the two districts’ borders were reconfigured in 2012. A member of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and the Financial Services Committee, he played a key role in the 2008 creation of the Office of Congressional Ethics and helped secure funding for the Green Line Extension, community health centers, and the Fairmount Community Rail Line.

What’s the most pressing issue facing residents of the Seventh District, and what’s one thing you’ll be able to do to address it in Congress?* The biggest challenges we face are creating affordable housing, guaranteeing access to quality health care, building stronger schools, and investing in reliable transportation. The biggest threat to our ability to meet those challenges is Donald Trump. His destructive policies not only threaten our progress but threaten our gains in these important areas.

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It’s January 2019, and you’re back in Congress. What are the first three things on your to-do list? We must take action on comprehensive immigration reform, a major infrastructure bill, and protecting the Affordable Care Act, including preexisting conditions protections. We must protect the Dreamers and those here on Temporary Protected Status so they are no longer threatened by Donald Trump. And we need to craft a bipartisan bill to invest in our crumbling bridges and aging transit systems.

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What would you like voters to know about the differences between you and your opponent? No one will fight harder against Donald Trump and for the people in our communities than me. We’re in the fight of our lives — everything we care about is at risk. I have a track record of bringing billions of dollars to the district for transportation, affordable housing, and community health centers. And a track record of taking on Donald Trump. I want to keep fighting for this district.

Would you vote for Nancy Pelosi if she runs again for minority leader or speaker? It remains far too early to discuss leadership while we’re still fighting to get a majority in the House in the first place. Those questions should wait until after November 6th.

What’s your favorite thing to do, eat, or see in the neighborhood where you live?

When I’m not in Congress, I like to work around the house, eat at good restaurants in Somerville, and play basketball with my sons.

Ayanna Pressley.
Ayanna Pressley. (Jim Davis/Globe Staff)

Ayanna S. Pressley

Pressley, 44, is a member of the Boston City Council, the first woman of color elected to the body. Since that election in 2009, Pressley has won four consecutive terms. On the council, she helped revise a Boston Public Schools policy to reduce the dropout rate among parenting and pregnant teens and pushed to expand the number of liquor licenses available to help the struggling restaurant industry in Dorchester, Mattapan, and Roxbury. She grew up in Chicago, attended Boston University, and worked as an aide to then-Senator John Kerry and then-Representative Joseph P. Kennedy II. She lives in Dorchester.

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What’s the most pressing issue facing residents of the Seventh District, and what’s one thing you’ll be able to do to address it in Congress?* The Seventh District is one of the most diverse districts in the country, but it is also one of the most unequal. The issues facing the district are not new – they have existed for decades. There is no single focus or piece of legislation that will address all of these challenges. That is why I’ve rolled out a comprehensive Equity Agenda, which proposes collaborative, community-driven solutions.

It’s January 2019, and you’re in Congress. What are the first three things on your to-do list? My priorities will be fighting to protect our immigrant communities and pass comprehensive immigration reform, passing common-sense legislation to address the epidemic of gun violence and the resulting trauma in our communities, and preserving critical access to health care and taking steps to improve public health outcomes in our communities.

What would you like voters to know about the differences between you and your opponent? While my opponent’s campaign has focused almost exclusively on the threat presented by the man in the White House, we have sought to broaden the conversation by spotlighting the entrenched inequalities [that] existed long before Trump took office and have only worsened under his tenure. We need a representative who will not simply resist Trump, but who can articulate a vision for the Seventh District.

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Would you vote for Nancy Pelosi if she runs again for minority leader or speaker? As I have said throughout the campaign, I would not hire a principal for a school without knowing the values and mission statement of the school – the Democratic Party is currently struggling to define its values and its mission; I believe it is premature to say who should be leading it in Congress, especially when we don’t even yet know who will step forward and offer to serve.

What’s your favorite thing to do, eat, or see in the neighborhood where you live?

One of my favorites is the Ashmont Grill, where my husband, Conan, and I had our first date.

There are no Republican candidates in this race.

Read more from the Globe about this race and its candidates:

•In a heated debate, Pressley launches an offensive against Capuano

•Is change coming to Massachusetts politics this fall? Or maybe not so much?

•Michael Capuano, Ayanna Pressley touch on race, seniority in debate

•In first debate, Capuano and Pressley save toughest hits for Trump

•Michael Capuano and Ayanna Pressley: What’s the difference?

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•Capuano-Pressley matchup reflects divisions in Democratic Party

•Capuano seizes on impeachment as he tries to fend off liberal challenge

•Ayanna Pressley endorses defunding ICE

An asterisk (*) notes campaign representatives said they filled out the survey questions on behalf of the candidates.

The Globe’s primary guide was written by Globe correspondents Matt Stout, Marek Mazurek, Sophia Eppolito, and Jamie Halper, as well as Joshua Miller, Maria Cramer, Michael Levenson, Milton J. Valencia and Stephanie Ebbert of the Globe staff.

It was compiled and edited by Shira Center, and produced by Christina Prignano.