fb-pixel

Here’s a look at the candidates on the Sept. 4 primary ballot, with biographies reported and compiled by Globe staff and correspondents. Candidates have also filled out a brief survey at our request.

Treasurer

The official who manages the state’s public deposits and investments, as well as its lottery and unclaimed property.

Candidates:

Democrat

Deb Goldberg.
Deb Goldberg.(Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff)

Deborah B. Goldberg

Goldberg, 64, of Brookline, has worked as an executive at Stop and Shop, which her family founded, before entering the public sector, according to her website. She is a former selectman and chair of the Town of Brookline and has served as a commissioner of Brookline’s Neighborhood Conservation District Committee. After an unsuccessful bid for lieutenant governor in 2016, she ran for state treasurer in 2014 and won. During her time in office, Goldberg has expanded the Financial Literacy Trust Fund and created the Office of Economic Empowerment, which offers college savings plans for kindergarteners and middle school students.

What are your top priorities as treasurer? Continue managing Treasury departments through prudent business practices, fiscal policies, and integrity. Expand our public/private partnership programs including wage negotiation for women, fraud protection for seniors, college savings plans for kids, and retirement plans for nonprofit employees.

Advertisement



What are two things that the state can do to improve its finances? As I have recommended since my first day in office, we must grow the Commonwealth’s “rainy day” fund by reinvesting surplus revenues and building our reserves. We can also improve the state’s finances by continuing to invest in our infrastructure such as bridges, roads, clean water, and schools.

Who is most responsible for the state’s creditworthiness being downgraded last year, and what can the state do to regain that trust? As treasurer, my job is not to assess blame but advise and work with our partners. This year’s transfer to reserves was an excellent start and must continue. Also, maintaining our outstanding disclosure statements, investor outreach, and annual investor conferences, with transparency in all we do.

Advertisement



What would you do to increase lottery ticket sales? Since taking office, we have had record-breaking sales annually. We are now finishing new IT systems and increasing strategic digital marketing and a robust players club. I have filed a bill for iLottery, as states that have iLottery have seen revenue growth for them and their retail partners, too.

What’s your favorite lottery game/scratch ticket? As chair of the Lottery, I do not play. However, my favorite is “Cashword.” It is like a crossword puzzle, mentally challenging and a lot of fun too!

Republican

Keiko Orrall.
Keiko Orrall.(Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe)

Keiko M. Orrall

The first Asian-American woman elected to the State House, Orrall, 50, has served as a representative since 2011. She’s been a critic of nationalized school testing standards, including the PARCC test, and opposed plans for a tribal casino in Taunton. Orrall grew up in Cincinnati and attended Smith College in Northampton, where she majored in education, according to her website. She taught public school for several years and lives in Lakeville.

What will be your top priorities as treasurer?* Providing accountability and transparency for the taxpayers. Improving operational effectiveness and efficiency. Reviewing regulation and eliminating unnecessary roadblocks for small businesses and municipalities. Improving the partnership with the Legislature and communication with key stakeholders.

What are two things that the state can do to improve its finances? 1. Focus on helping small businesses create more jobs, which will in turn increase tax revenue. 2. Address the areas of the state’s budget that represent an unsustainable level of spending like health care. The Legislature must address this by passing a health care bill that includes real cost savings.

Advertisement



Who is most responsible for the state’s creditworthiness being downgraded last year, and what can the state do to regain that trust? The Legislature is most responsible for the downgrade by not increasing contributions to the state’s rainy-day fund. The Legislature can also protect the state’s credit rating by tackling the budget busters that threaten the Commonwealth’s long-term fiscal health.

What would you do to increase lottery ticket sales? Fine tuning of existing games and increase the overall odds of winning a prize.

What’s your favorite lottery game/scratch ticket? Powerball

Read more from the Globe about this race and its candidates:

https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2018/03/01/time-for-fund-giants-step-gun-laws/Qrxlyv3ZERMfLdpalTbVXO/story.html

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2018/02/13/state-rep-keiko-orrall-challenge-goldberg-for-treasurer/w30iZrTH4HmpnU7OIfXTuM/story.html

An asterisk (*) notes campaign representatives said they filled out the survey questions on behalf of the candidates.

The Globe’s primary guide was written by Globe correspondents Matt Stout, Marek Mazurek, Sophia Eppolito, and Jamie Halper, as well as Joshua Miller, Maria Cramer, Michael Levenson, Milton J. Valencia and Stephanie Ebbert of the Globe staff.

It was compiled and edited by Shira Center, and produced by Christina Prignano.