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The pace of Trump’s misleading statements has increased. Here are the most recent ones

President Trump.Jabin Botsford/Washington Post

Republican President Trump has been making a flurry of public appearances and statements, looking to fire up his diehard supporters to vote for GOP candidates in Tuesday’s midterm elections. Facing the possible loss of Republican control of Congress, he’s been trying to stoke fear of immigrants.

Along the way, he’s been uttering a wave of false and misleading statements that have sent the media’s fact-checkers scrambling.

The wave adds to a tsunami of false and misleading statements he’s made since the beginning of his presidency. The Washington Post reports he’s made 6,420 such statements since he took the job. The pace has picked up in the past seven weeks, the Post reported, so that he’s now averaging 30 a day.

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Here is a roundup compiled from fact-checkers at The Associated Press, New York Times, Washington Post, and Politifact.com, of a number of Trump’s false and misleading statements from recent days:

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TRUMP:

‘‘At this very moment, large well-organized caravans of migrants are marching towards our southern border. Some people call it an invasion. . . . These are tough people in many cases; a lot of young men, strong men and a lot of men that maybe we don’t want in our country. . . . This isn’t an innocent group of people. It’s a large number of people that are tough. They have injured, they have attacked.’’

THE FACTS:

He suggests without evidence that people in the caravans are, by and large, dangerous, hardened criminals.

The migrants in the caravans are mostly from Honduras, where it started, as well as El Salvador and Guatemala. Overall, they are poor, carrying only the belongings that fit into a knapsack and fleeing gang violence or poverty.

It might be true that there are some criminals mixed in with the throngs, given the sheer number of migrants. But Trump did not substantiate his claim that members of the MS-13 gang, in particular, are among them.

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Some migrants in one of the caravans clashed with Mexican police at the Mexico-Guatemala border, hurling stones and other objects as they tried to cross the international bridge. One migrant died; it’s not clear how it happened. Caravan leaders said they had expelled a number of troublemakers from the procession, exhibiting some self-policing. Ultimately, most entered Guatemala — and later, Mexico — by illegally bypassing immigration checkpoints.

The caravan otherwise has been overwhelmingly peaceful, receiving applause and donated food from residents of the towns they pass. Mexican police have not tried again to stop them.

The Department of Homeland Security issued a fact sheet stating that ‘‘over 270 individuals along the caravan route have criminal histories, including known gang membership.’’ It did not specify how it had arrived at that number. The Associated Press reports that there an estimated 4,000 total in the caravan.

Sesar, 6, sleeps along the road with her family as members of the Central American migrant caravan move to the next town in the pre-dawn hours on Friday in Matias Romero, Mexico.Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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TRUMP:

“This is the — I’m sending up the military. This is the military. And they’re standing there and one thing that we’ll have. . . . When they are captured, we don’t let them out.”

THE FACTS:

Trump implied on Fox News that the immigrants could be “captured” by the military. The 5,200 troops deploying to the border will not be apprehending migrants. The Defense Department says these troops will be operating under legal restraints and providing a range of support services to US Customs and Border Protection, the agency that patrols the Rio Grande and carries out border apprehensions.

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Soldiers arrive at Valley International Airport, Harlingen, Texas, to conduct the first missions along the southern border in support of Operation Faithful Patriot on Thursday.US Air Force/AFP/Getty Images

TRUMP:

“We’re not letting them into our country. And then they never show up, almost, it’s like a level of 3 percent. They never show up for the trial. So by the time their trial comes, they’re gone, nobody knows where they are.”

THE FACTS:

Trump’s numbers are wrong. He was referring to the rate that migrants show up to immigration court proceedings after being apprehended and released into the United States. Data from the Justice Department shows that most immigrants do, in fact, show up to their court hearings.

In the 2017 fiscal year, about 28 percent of the released immigrants failed to attend their court hearings — a far cry from the 97 percent Trump estimated.

Among asylum-seekers, only 11 percent did not show up for legal proceedings. Of the asylum-seekers who participated in a pilot program tested as an alternative to detention, 99 percent attended Immigration and Custom Enforcement check-ins and appointments. And 100 percent turned up for court hearings.

The Trump administration canceled the pilot program last June.

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TRUMP:

‘‘President Obama separated the children from parents and nobody complained. When we continued the exact same law, the country went crazy.’’

THE FACTS:

Actually, President Barack Obama did not do the same thing as a matter of policy.

While it’s true the underlying laws were the same, the Trump administration mandated that anyone caught crossing the border illegally was to be criminally prosecuted. That policy meant adults were taken to court for criminal proceedings, and their children were separated and sent into the care of the Health and Human Services Department, which is tasked with caring for unaccompanied migrant children. The so-called zero-tolerance policy remains in effect, but Trump signed an executive order June 20 that stopped separations.

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Jeh Johnson, Obama’s homeland security secretary, recently told NPR there may have been unusual or emergency circumstances during Obama’s tenure when children were taken from parents, but there was no such policy.

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TRUMP:

‘‘And we now have 25 or 30 million people in this country illegally, because of what’s been happening over many years.’’

THE FACTS:

It’s nowhere close to 25 million to 30 million, nor has the number increased much in recent years.

The nonpartisan Pew Research Center estimates there were about 11.3 million immigrants in the US illegally in 2016, the most recent data available. That number is basically unchanged from 2009.

The number of such immigrants had reached a height of 12.2 million in 2007, representing about 4 percent of the US population, before declining due in part to a weakening US economy.

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TRUMP:

‘‘It was always told to me that you needed a constitutional amendment [to change birthright citizenship]. Guess what? You don’t. . . . Well, you can definitely do it with an act of Congress. But now they’re saying I can do it just with an executive order.’’

THE FACTS:

Scholars widely pan the idea that Trump could unilaterally change the rules on who is a citizen. It’s highly questionable whether an act of Congress could do it, either, though it is conceivable that legislators could change the rules regarding children born in the US of parents who are in the country illegally.

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Peter Schuck is perhaps the most prominent advocate of the idea that birthright citizenship is not conveyed by the Constitution to children of parents who are living illegally in the US. Even he says ‘‘Trump clearly cannot act by’’ executive order.

‘‘I feel confident that no competent lawyer would advise him otherwise,’’ he told the Associated Press Tuesday. ‘‘This is just pre-election politics and misrepresentation and should be sharply criticized as such.’’

Schuck, of Yale, and colleague Rogers Smith of the University of Pennsylvania have argued since the mid-1980s that Congress can set the rules for providing citizenship to US-born children of parents who came illegally.

But most scholars on the left and right share the view that it would take a constitutional amendment to deny automatic citizenship to children born in the US to parents who are in the country illegally.

“The idea that the president has the power to end birthright citizenship, plainly protected by Section 1 of the Fourteenth Amendment, by executive order is preposterous. Constitutional scholars who agree about little else have agreed about this for over a century,” Michael Klarman, a professor at Harvard Law School, said in an e-mail

Gerard Magliocca, a professor at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law who is an expert on the 14th Amendment, said a move by Trump to eliminate birthright citizenship by executive order would instantly meet with legal challenges — and ultimately fail in the nation’s highest court.

“If this were to reach the Supreme Court, you would get eight or nine votes to say it’s unconstitutional. Even [Justice Neil Gorsuch] or [Justice Brett] Kavanaugh would say it’s unconstitutional,” he said in a telephone interview. “The original meaning of the birthright citizenship clause in the 14th Amendment is so clear that they would have no choice.”

James Ho, a conservative Trump-appointed federal appeals court judge, wrote in the Green Bag legal journal in 2006 that birthright citizenship ‘‘is protected no less for children of undocumented persons than for descendants of Mayflower passengers.’’

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TRUMP:

“We’re the only country in the world where a person comes in, has a baby and the baby is essentially a citizen of the United States for 85 years with all of those benefits. It’s ridiculous. It’s ridiculous. And it has to end.’’

THE FACTS:

That’s flat-out wrong.

The US is among about 30 countries where birthright citizenship — the principle of jus soli or ‘‘right of the soil’’ — is applied, according to the World Atlas and other sources. Most are in the Americas. Canada and Mexico are among them. Most other countries confer citizenship based on that of at least one parent — jus sanguinis, or ‘‘right of blood’’ — or have a modified form of birthright citizenship that may restrict automatic citizenship to children of parents who are on their territory legally.

More broadly, Trump’s view that US-born children of foreigners live a lifetime of taking ‘‘all those benefits’’ ignores the taxes they pay, the work they do, and their other contributions to society.

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Trump has been campaigning feverishly for GOP candidates.Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

TRUMP:

“Birthright citizens, in turn, can then bring their entire extended family into our country through chain migration. That’s another beauty. Chain migration. You come into the country, you’re, like, 2 months old and you’re going to take your brother, and your sister and your mother and your father. You’re going to bring them all.”

THE FACTS:

This is impossible. American citizens must be at least 21 before they are eligible to petition for their parents to live in the United States, and there is a long queue for family-sponsored immigration, or what the president labels “chain migration.”

After a petition is filed and approved, would-be immigrants are given a so-called priority date and can apply for a green card only when the State Department calls it up. For example, this month, brothers and sisters of adult American citizens can begin to apply for a green card if their priority dates were before March 22, 2005 — a waiting period of more than 13 years.

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TRUMP:

“We can’t get any Democrat votes to change them [immigration laws]. It’s only the Republicans that are in unison they want to change them. They want to make strong borders.”

THE FACTS:

This is misleading.

Citing immigration laws that he said “are so bad,” Trump accused Democrats of causing overhaul legislation to fizzle in Congress. Left unsaid was that disarray among the Republican Party partly contributed to the bills’ demise.

In February, after Trump moved to rescind protections for the young immigrants known as Dreamers, the Senate rejected three immigration proposals. Fourteen Republican senators voted against the one that was backed by the White House; it received the least support of the three from the president’s own party.

After a public outcry over the Trump administration’s zero-tolerance immigration policy that resulted in migrant children being separated from their families after crossing the border, the House rejected a hard-line immigration bill in June that was backed by the White House. Forty-one Republicans voted against it.

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TRUMP:

“The Democrat Party’s vision is to offer them free health care, free welfare, free education and even the right to vote.”

THE FACTS:

Legal immigrants to the United States can receive some public benefits and have a pathway to citizenship and the right to vote. But that is a matter of law — not merely the political platform or policies of the Democratic Party.

Migrants who are granted asylum are eligible for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Medicaid, and the Supplemental Security Income program. They are also eligible for the cash assistance program known as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, according to the Congressional Research Service.

Immigrants in the country illegally are not eligible for most public programs and cannot vote. While a 2013 Senate bill to overhaul the immigration system would have allowed unauthorized immigrants who had arrived in the United States before December 2011 to apply for citizenship, the House never voted on the legislation. Trump’s own “four pillars” for immigration reform also included a pathway to citizenship for Dreamers.

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TRUMP:

“And once that control is set and standardized and made very strong, including the building of the wall, which we’ve already started. $1.6 billion spent last year, $1.6 billion this year. We have another $1.6 that will be coming, but we want to build it at one time.”

THE FACTS:

A spending bill signed by Trump in March allotted $1.6 billion for projects to replace old barriers along the border with new ones. But that bill did not allow spending funds on a new border wall.

Trump signed another spending bill in late September, which did not include any money for his border wall — a fact he seemed aware of, given his criticisms over the lack of funding.

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TRUMP:

“Democrats let him [cop killer Luis Bracamontes] into our country . . . Democrats let him stay.” — Trump-endorsed ad.

THE FACTS:

On Wednesday, Trump tweeted a campaign-style video about two California sheriff officers who were fatally shot by an immigrant in the country illegally, Luis Bracamontes. Trump said in an interview published Friday by the Washington Times that the video, which has been denounced by officials from both parties as a racist campaign tactic, was tough “but correct.”

Politifact.com reports, “The reality is that Bracamontes’ last illegal entry was under Bush, a Republican president. The majority of his time going undetected was also on the Republican watch, though some of it was on the Democrats’ watch, too. Democratic and Republican administrations deported Bracamontes, but also failed to keep Bracamontes out of the United States. We found no evidence that he was proactively allowed to stay. ”

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TRUMP:

“We opened up Canada [on trade]. It was closed.”

THE FACTS:

In pointing to the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement negotiated by his administration, Trump overreached by claiming that American companies previously had no access to the Canadian market.

The North American Free Trade Agreement of 1994 virtually eliminated tariffs on all goods traded between the United States, Canada, and Mexico, with the exception of Canadian agricultural products.

In 2017, the United States exported about $340.7 billion in goods and services to Canada, which was the United States’ largest trading partner after China.

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MISCELLANEOUS DUBIOUS OR FALSE STATEMENTS:

The New York Times fact-checker, at one point, switched to a bullet list, noting that the following statements at a rally in Missouri Thursday night had been previously debunked.

■  Trump exaggerated the US trade deficit with China as $500 billion a year. (It was $336 billion last year.)

■  He falsely claimed that the United States had the “cleanest water and air” in the world. (Numerous countries ranked higher.)

■  He misleadingly claimed that the border wall is being built. (Construction has not begun.)

■  He falsely accused Democrats of supporting “open borders.” (Democrats support border security measures.)

■  He said Democrats “want to invite caravan after caravan.” (There is no evidence that Democrats are behind the migrant caravan.)

■  He accused other countries, with no evidence, of not “giving us their finest” through the diversity visa program. (Applicants enter of their own volition.)

■  He falsely claimed “Medicare for all” proposals would “destroy Medicare.” (The plans would expand benefits for lower costs.)

■  He claimed, with no evidence, that the suspect in the Manhattan truck attack last year “brought in 22 people” through “chain migration.” (This is not possible.)

■  He misleadingly claimed that “nobody would believe” that the economy added 4.2 million jobs since the election. (The economy added more jobs in the comparable period before his election.)

■  He claimed that lawmakers couldn’t pass “right to try” legislation for “46 years.” (A similar federal program has existed for decades.)


Material from Globe wire services was used in this report.