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UN wants migrants headed to US designated as refugees

People who fled Honduras and El Salvador and crossed the US-Mexico border were stopped in Granjeno, Texas. Central Americans are fleeing violence at the hands of gangs.
People who fled Honduras and El Salvador and crossed the US-Mexico border were stopped in Granjeno, Texas. Central Americans are fleeing violence at the hands of gangs.Eric Gay/Associated Press

SAN JOSE, Costa Rica — United Nations officials are pushing for many of the Central Americans fleeing to the United States to be treated as refugees displaced by armed conflict, a designation meant to increase pressure on the United States and Mexico to accept tens of thousands of people currently ineligible for asylum.

Officials with the UN High Commissioner for Refugees say they hope to see movement toward a regional agreement on that status Thursday when migration and interior department representatives from the United States, Mexico, and Central America meet in Nicaragua. The group will discuss updating a 30-year-old declaration regarding the obligations that nations have to aid refugees.

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While such a resolution would lack any legal weight, the agency said it believes ‘‘the US and Mexico should recognize that this is a refugee situation, which implies that they shouldn’t be automatically sent to their home countries but rather receive international protection.’’

Most of the people widely considered to be refugees by the international community are fleeing more traditional political or ethnic conflicts like those in Syria or the Sudan. Central Americans would be among the first modern migrants considered refugees because they are fleeing violence and extortion at the hands of criminal gangs.

Central America’s Northern Triangle of Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras has become one of the most violent regions on earth in recent years, with swaths of all three countries under the control of drug traffickers and street gangs who rob, rape, and extort ordinary citizens with impunity.

Honduras, a primary transit point for US-bound cocaine, has the world’s highest homicide rate for a nation that is not at war. Hondurans who are used to hiding indoors at night have been terrorized anew in recent months by a wave of attacks against churches, schools, and buses.

During a recent visit to the United States, President Juan Orlando Hernandez of Honduras said migrants from his country were ‘‘displaced by war,’’ and called on the United States to acknowledge that.

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Honduran police routinely are accused of civil rights violations. The AP has reported at least five cases of alleged gang members missing or killed after being taken into police custody in what critics and human rights advocates call death squads engaged in a wave of social cleansing of criminals.

Violence by criminal organizations spread after members of California street gangs were deported to Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, where they overwhelmed weak and corrupt police forces.

In El Salvador, the end of a truce between street gangs has led to a steep rise in homicides this year.

Salvadorans heading north through Mexico who were interviewed last month said there also was fear of the ‘‘Sombra Negra,’’ or ‘‘Black Shadow’’ — groups of masked men in civilian clothes who are believed responsible for extrajudicial killings of teens in gang-controlled neighborhoods. The Salvadoran government denies any involvement in death squads, but says it is investigating the reports.

In El Salvador, at least 135,000 people, or 2.1 percent of the population, have been forced to leave their homes, the vast majority due to gang extortion and violence, according to UN figures.

That’s more than twice the percentage displaced by Colombia’s brutal civil war, the UN says.

Immigration experts in the United States and Central America say the flow of migrants from Honduras and El Salvador is likely to rise as the two countries experience more gang-related violence.

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‘‘They are leaving for some reason. Let’s not send them back in a mechanical way, but rather evaluate the reasons they left their country,’’ Fernando Protti, regional representative for the UN refugee agency, said.