Letters

letters | What we talk about when we talk about ‘Boston Strong’

Expression of solidarity springs from a shared need for healing, hope

Dustin Pedroia took batting practice at Fenway Park Oct. 21 as the Red Sox prepared to play the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series.
Elise Amendola/Associated Press/File
Dustin Pedroia took batting practice at Fenway Park Oct. 21 as the Red Sox prepared to play the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series.

To some outsiders, the “Boston Strong” business might seem overplayed. However, that tragic day at the Boston Marathon had the kind of impact on this smaller city that 9/11 had on New York City and the world.

My daughter, Kate, and her younger son, Peter, used the family’s season’s bleacher tickets to see the Red Sox game, which always takes place the morning of Marathon day. The weather was beautiful, much like that fateful day in September 2001.

When the bombs went off, Kate and Peter were underground on the Green Line. Little did they know that such evildoings would bring this city together in a way that no sports team’s victory could. Still, the Red Sox, Bruins, Celtics, and Patriots knew that they had to join in the rebuilding of pride, confidence, and HOPE for the many victims and the region as a whole, and that their efforts would help toward physical and spiritual healing.

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The rest of the country instinctively joined in this effort, and in a sense, Wednesday night’s World Series victory for the Red Sox belongs to us all, no matter which teams we support. We will never forget the tributes paid in Cleveland, New York, and everywhere else.

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Thankfully, that day in April, Kate and Peter made their way to North Station and headed north to New Hampshire, shaken, saddened, but resilient as must we all be, no matter what.

Michel L. Spitzer

Jamaica Plain