Editorials

editorial

Nova Scotia ferry: Don’t forget your Bruins jersey

The passenger ferry Nova Star arriving in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, on Tuesday.
Andrew Vaughan/Associated Press
The passenger ferry Nova Star arriving in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, on Tuesday.

THE RESUMPTION of daily ferry service between New England and Nova Scotia on May 15 revives a historic link that has waned of late. The two regions share a strong kinship, symbolized by the gift of a Christmas tree from Halifax to Boston every year, and in recent decades overnight ferries became a summertime tradition. But a high-speed catamaran replaced the traditional ferry on the Portland-to-Yarmouth route in 2004, draining all the romance out of the trip. Losing money, the service ceased in 2009.

The new service, subsidized by the Nova Scotia government, will take a more civilized 10 hours to transport New Englanders to a faraway land of lobstermen, lighthouses, candlepin bowling, and Bruins fans. If the Portland ferry proves successful, Nova Scotia should consider connecting to Boston next. More than just a travel option, it would be a reminder of continuing ties.

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