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Story of hope and cure is also a call for stem cell progress

New Hampshire teen Behaylu Barry (left) was reunited with Ethiopian siblings Eden, 9, and Rediat, 16, in hopes of finding a match for a bone marrow transplant.
New Hampshire teen Behaylu Barry (left) was reunited with Ethiopian siblings Eden, 9, and Rediat, 16, in hopes of finding a match for a bone marrow transplant.Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff

As the father of a child who was cured of severe aplastic anemia by a bone marrow transplant, I found the Globe’s story of Behaylu Barry profoundly moving and hopeful (“From a land he once knew, a perfect match,” Page A1, May 3). But it also reminded me of all the patients who are desperate for a transplant but for whom there is no matched donor.

Cord blood stem cells hold tremendous potential to change this. Witness the astounding work in Seattle of Harvard-trained Dr. Colleen Delaney.

We need a greater system to save and store cord blood. And we need to better fund such science.

Paul C. McLean
Brookline