fb-pixel Skip to main content
OP/EXTRA

Questions for the candidates: What’s your transportation priority?

Our regular Q & A series

Traffic is often heavy on 93 South approaching Boston.Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff

Transportation is a perennial issue in Massachusetts. Congestion is worsening, infrastructure is crumbling, and people in underserved neighborhoods need easier access to work. But funds are limited. We asked the gubernatorial candidates what their top-priority transportation project would be, should they win the election.

Here’s what they had to say.

Steve Grossman

Steve Grossman

@SteveGrossmanMA, State Treasurer, Democrat

My top priority continues to be fully funding and implementing the priorities outlined in “The Way Forward,” the ten-year program designed to transform our public transportation and infrastructure system: new rail cars for the MBTA, deferred maintenance, extending the Green Line to Somerville and Medford, modernizing South Station, South Coast Rail, enhanced rail service to Cape Cod and Western Massachusetts, and ensuring that our regional transit authorities (RTAs) are financially secure. All transportation investments must aim to reduce our carbon footprint, incentivize residents to maximize the use of public transportation, and create new transit-oriented multi-family housing. In addition to relying on the significant down payment made by the Legislature (including indexing the gas tax to inflation), which I support, as well as the transportation bond bill, I’m the only candidate for governor to advocate for using prospective revenue from Internet sales taxes to help fully fund this transformational agenda.”

Jeff McCormick

Jeff McCormick

@JMacForGov Venture Capitalist, Independent

Advertisement



My highest priority as Governor for transportation is to repair and modernize the current assets that we have. We have an extensive backlog of transportation fixes that need to be addressed before we take on more expansion that will drive up the overall long term maintenance costs. In addition, transportation funding needs to be equitable across the Commonwealth. Access to reliable 21st century transportation infrastructure will grow jobs and attract new companies to bring their business here. We need to think long term about the entire Commonwealth.

Charlie Baker

Charlie Baker

@CharlieforGov, Former health insurance executive, Republican

Advertisement



Transportation in Massachusetts is an issue that needs addressing, but the solution to our challenges is not just to spend more and more money. Massachusetts needs to develop a strategic and comprehensive plan that looks at our transportation needs in the context of statewide and regional economic and community needs. We also need to consider cost savings and ways to achieve our objectives in more cost-effective ways. My biggest priority as governor will be bringing a cooperative (state, local and regional) approach to long-term strategic planning that addresses our present and future transportation needs, while protecting taxpayers.

Evan Falchuk

@EFalchuk, Health care entrepreneur, Independent

Scott Lively

Scott Lively

Pastor of Abiding Truth Ministries, Independent

Overcrowding in Mass. cities is a direct consequence of the globalist United Nations Agenda 21 project, which has been using land use policies and financial incentives to push humans out of the rural areas into the cities since 1992. Massachusetts has bought into Agenda 21 in a major way, though most citizens have never heard of it. I would reverse the Agenda 21 process and work to restore the model of environmentally-conscious self-sufficient agrarian farm-communities which New England was once known for, and which offer a substantially better and healthier way of life. This would alleviate the stress of overcrowding in the cities and restore struggling rural economies at the same time.

Mark Fisher

Mark Fisher

@markfisher2014, Small business owner, Republican

Maintaining and repairing our roads and bridges are what MA citizens expect their government to provide. I propose that we invest heavily in this area before we consider any new projects. Let’s stabilize our current infrastructure before we attempt to build on it. Once we get our roads and bridges back in shape and create a feasible program to maintain them going forward, then we can begin a discussion about future needs. Our current transportation needs are job number one! To fund the projects: President Kennedy reminded us, increased revenues come through a reduction in taxes. My proposals to reduce the sales and income taxes to 5 percent, as we were promised, will give citizens more money to stimulate the economy and increase state revenues. Additionally, my 4 point program to make MA business friendly will increase the pay rolls and further increase state revenues.

Advertisement



Martha Coakley

Martha Coakley

@Martha Coakley, Attorney General, Democrat

Our transportation infrastructure is critical to supporting our economy, creating jobs across the state and reducing our impact on the environment. Instead of focusing on one specific project, I would prioritize the regional projects that will ensure that every community of the Commonwealth has equal access to jobs and economic opportunity. Those include: South Coast Rail, the Urban Ring and the Knowledge Corridor rail line.