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Children posed under a sculpture of the Olympic rings in Coventry, England, in July 2012. London was the host city for the most recent Summer Games.
Children posed under a sculpture of the Olympic rings in Coventry, England, in July 2012. London was the host city for the most recent Summer Games.Hussein Malla/Associated Press/File

As a Boston-area resident who is fortunate enough to make a portion of my living in the Olympic movement, I have been frustrated, but hardly surprised, by the dominance of disapproval over Boston 2024’s being awarded the opportunity to bid for the 2024 Summer Games. The degree of skepticism at the prospect of Boston’s being able to successfully host the Games is unfair.

Certainly there are many issues — logistics, infrastructure, funding — that must be addressed, and those bidding must commit to operating in a transparent and accountable manner. However, to think that Boston, with some of the country’s best and brightest minds, can’t identify solutions to the challenges associated with hosting a world-class global sporting event is selling ourselves short.

Skeptics and pundits look at the excess, scandal, or corruption associated with Athens, Beijing, or Sochi. Instead, they should take note of the legacy facilities still found in Utah, the outstanding new public transit system in Vancouver, and the revitalization of the previously downtrodden East End in London as examples of the positive impact hosting can have on a city and a region.

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To those who would argue that resources, taxpayer and otherwise, could be better deployed on non-Olympic-related expenditures, I would counter that, human nature being what it is, we need a catalyst to spark infrastructure upgrades, renewal, and development.

Let’s give the leaders of Boston 2024 the time that they need, between now and the 2017 submission deadline, to figure out a plan that accomplishes the goal of hosting the best Olympic Games ever while benefiting Boston in the long term.

Shawn McBride
Stoughton

The writer has more than 15 years’ experience in marketing and public relations, including working with several international and US Olympic sponsors. He is not affiliated with Boston 2024.