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How could city let sacred Prouty Garden space go?

Generations of patients and caregivers have sought comfort in the Prouty Garden at Boston Children’s Hospital. The hospital plans to build an expansion where the garden now stands.

Wendy Maeda/Globe Staff/File 2013

Generations of patients and caregivers have sought comfort in the Prouty Garden at Boston Children’s Hospital. The hospital plans to build an expansion where the garden now stands.

I read your article online about the vote of the Boston Landmarks Commission to reject landmark status for the Prouty Garden at Boston Children’s Hospital. I, for one, can’t imagine why the commission voted this way, except for the fact that those who wish to destroy the garden have greater influence and money.

There was a sign in the garden for everyone to see indicating that the Prouty Garden would be available in perpetuity for the people of Boston. Talk about a promise broken.

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My little brother’s ashes were scattered in the Prouty Garden because we understood that it was going to exist in perpetuity. I am heartbroken about this and about the fact that the people of Boston appear to have no understanding of their responsibility in regard to this garden. Destroying the Prouty is the same as dismantling the Bunker Hill Monument or destroying the Statue of Liberty.

This is a disgrace and a shame from which the city will never recover.

Elizabeth A. Richter

Canton, Conn.

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