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1963 vision of economic equality still unfulfilled

State Representative Byron Rushing and John Dukakis at the unveiling of the A. Philip Randolph statue in Boston’s Back Bay Station.

John Tlumacki/Globe Staff/File 2008

State Representative Byron Rushing and John Dukakis at the unveiling of the A. Philip Randolph statue in Boston’s Back Bay Station.

Jack Curtis’s Ideas article on the 1963 March for Jobs and Freedom (“The March on Washington’s other agenda,” Aug. 25) was a useful reminder of the economic-equality side of the march and especially of the contributions of A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin, his longtime aide. It did not, I think, capture sufficiently one aspect of the unique genius of these two great men: Although they were both courageous leaders of the black struggle in America, their concern and vision extended to all Americans.

While they certainly knew well the scourges of unemployment and poverty among black people, the policies they advocated — full employment and a war against poverty — were meant to raise up all the downtrodden, whatever the color of their skin. Sadly, the vision they gave us of decent living conditions and jobs for all is still unfulfilled.

Eldon R.

Clingan

Dedham

The writer was a participant in the 1963 March for Jobs and Freedom.

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