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Charters offer quality, hope to my daughter

City on a Hill Charter School student volunteers check names of future students drawn from a list of hopefuls on charter school placement lottery day in March. More than 13,600 names were entered for nearly 2,200 open seats.
City on a Hill Charter School student volunteers check names of future students drawn from a list of hopefuls on charter school placement lottery day in March. More than 13,600 names were entered for nearly 2,200 open seats.(Essdras M Suarez/ Globe Staff)

I READ Joan Vennochi's recent column entitled "Charter school battle erodes middle ground,"Opinion, July 13) with the eye of a mother who has children in both charter and district schools. But I came away with a different conclusion than the mom quoted in the column.

I am a single mother raising five children. My youngest daughter won a seat at Smith Leadership Academy. Even though she is in the seventh grade, and despite a learning disability, she is outperforming her 18-year-old brother, who is at a district high school and can barely fill out a job application.

Next year my daughter will graduate from Smith Leadership, and I will have to hope and pray that she will win a chance to attend a charter high school. Unless I get three jobs, I will not be able to pay for private school.

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Communities of color are still fighting for a fair shot. That's what this debate is about. I support lifting the cap on charters so that we can give our children a chance at a better future. I am disappointed the Massachusetts Senate has decided to do nothing about increasing the opportunity for students to attend charter schools. My daughter's hopes of graduating from a good high school depend on winning a lottery.

Tonya Morris
Dorchester