Letters

Letters

The short life of Aaron Hernandez

Patriots have stayed
above this scandal

On the day the New England Patriots were celebrating their brightest moment and most glorious achievement in team history at the White House, the protagonist of their darkest chapter, convicted murderer Aaron Hernandez, ended his wretched life in a prison cell (“Violent end to a troubled life,” Page A1, April 20).

A lot of people unfairly criticize the Patriots for ever drafting Hernandez, who apparently never severed ties to a gang subculture.

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But I believe the Patriots made the best of a bad situation and should be commended.

They gave an exceptional athlete with a questionable past the opportunity to make a great life for himself. And it was Hernandez who threw it all away.

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In our society, where a person is presumed innocent until proven guilty, I commend the Patriots organization for immediately breaking any connection with Hernandez when he was arrested for murder in 2013.

Evidently, they instinctively knew they had made a mistake over him, and for the good of the team and organization, they needed to separate themselves as quickly as possible. For that, I applaud owner Robert Kraft and head coach Bill Belichick for taking this swift and decisive action to protect their club from this heinous crime and scandal.

Eugene R. Dunn

Medford, N.Y.

Where life becomes a death penaly
of a different sort

Aaron Hernandez should be the poster boy for any anti-death penalty cause.

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If one needs proof of a punishment that resonates, that proof is Hernandez’s apparent suicide in prison. Not wanting to spend the rest of his days in a place where the freedoms he was used to were denied to him, he ends his life.

We have seen something like this before with Timothy McVeigh, the Oklahoma City bomber, when he dropped his appeals by saying that that he would rather be executed than spend his life in prison.

Life in prison is the ultimate penalty.

Al Maze

Plymouth

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