Letters

Just can’t kick the car habit

Cambridge is falling short of its goal to curb car ownership significantly by 2020.

Letters

Nick Cafardo’s reach was deeply felt

The Globe sports writer, who died Thursday, touched readers across generations. Here are two who honor his memory.

Letters

Amid bold aspirations, Boston turns a blind eye to underused Madison Park High School

“Why isn’t this Roxbury school also one of the city’s ‘transformational projects’?”

Letters

Here is why this white woman voted for Donald Trump

“I voted for Donald Trump because of his support for the protection of unborn children.”

Letters

On both sides of abortion debate, the issue is all about choice

“They key word here is ‘choose.’ A woman should have the right to choose.”

Letters

UMass Boston needs renewed sense of mission to go with cash infusion

“The Boston campus is turning its back on its past and those it was established to serve.”

Letters

Next Partners chief needs to repair hospital chain’s partnership with Harvard

“It is time for Partners to realize that its hospitals are affiliates of Harvard Medical School and not the reverse.”

Letters

Envisioning a path from a city hall to the Oval Office

Could a mayor be the next president? It depends, readers say, on the campaign and on which mayor.

Letters

Amazon’s exit is NYC’s loss (take note, Senator Warren)

“Senator Warren’s comments on Amazon’s decision to abandon its plans [in New York] were exceedingly unreasoned and inconsistent with the facts.”

Letters

GE in Boston . . . Amazon in NYC . . . seemed like ‘good’ ideas at the time

The shifting plans of GE, in Boston, and Amazon, in New York, have renewed focus on tax breaks.

Letters

The wealthy can definitely dig deeper at tax time

Readers react to Jeff Jacoby’s argument that keeping tax rates low would be the best way to get the most from the rich.

Letters

His 1970s experience in Peru offers a lesson for clash raging now in Venezuela

“I personally witnessed an exceptional case of hands-off policy while living under a leftist, populist military regime.”

Letters

A real emergency — Trump, that is, not the wall

With President Trump declaring a national emergency, readers start to put up a wall of resistance.

Letters

Offering alternatives to abortion, in both words and deeds

“Who are we as a society if we decide that, because a woman is poor, she should not be able to choose life for her baby?”

Letters

Would mayors seeking higher office be ready for world stage?

The president’s “successor will need a deep knowledge of world affairs to repair fractured relationships with our key allies and competitors alike.”

Letters

A mother loses her children in a fraught state system

The portrait of one mother’s challenges with DCF moved readers to raise hard questions about the state system.

Letters

Pediatrician bemoans rise in vaccine rejection

“Parents who reject vaccination for social or religious reasons are neglecting their children’s health.”

Letters

Reagan’s tax policy took its toll

“After Reagan left office, George H. W. Bush, who promised no new taxes, soon had to raise taxes.”

Letters

Do we hold the keys to unlock Boston’s gridlock?

A new ranking calls the city’s traffic the nation’s worst. Surprised? Readers weren’t. But they have a few ideas to offer.

Letters

Critique of Michelle Carter’s defense ignores case’s complexity

“Is Carter’s conduct like falsely yelling fire in a crowded theater? Hardly.”

Letters

For kids on MassHealth, agonizing delays in mental health care

Readers took note of a federal judge’s rebuke of the state for failing to provide prompt mental health services to low-income children.

Letters

Inequities in T service run along same rails as housing injustice

“Residents in working-class communities of color have fought for fairer T service for years.”

Letters

Saying the n-word

A Cambridge official’s use of the n-word in full during a class discussion on racial slurs has set off controversy.

Letters

Tough talk on drug prices? Sure, but don’t demonize a vital industry

“With MassHealth enrollment rising from 1.3 million in 2011 to 1.8 million today, why are we shocked that costs are rising as well?”

Letters

US goes nowhere in dealing with nuclear waste

Readers weigh in on the country’s costly failure to dispose of spent nuclear fuel.