Latest Quiet Skies headlines

TSA Administrator David Pekoske told a Senate committee Wednesday that air marshals keep detailed surveillance files on thousands of passengers not suspected of crimes.

TSA official tells Congress that Quiet Skies surveillance has yet to foil any threats

“It appears a huge waste of taxpayer dollars and a huge infringement on Americans,” said Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey, who pressed TSA officials in an oversight hearing Wednesday.

Passengers waited for baggage at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas.

What you need to know about the ‘Quiet Skies’ program

Here’s what we know about the program, in which federal air marshals follow, and collect information on, ordinary US citizens in airports and on planes.

Passengers wait for baggage at McCarran International Airport, Friday, June 29, 2018, in Las Vegas. The TSA projected that Friday could be its busiest day ever, with agents screening more than 2.7 million people. (AP Photo/John Locher)

EDITORIAL

A federal program that makes every American passenger a would-be terrorist

The Globe’s reporting on Quiet Skies raises questions, and Congress should demand answers from the agency’s leaders.

special report

Lawmakers demand answers on ‘Quiet Skies’ surveillance program after Globe report

After the Boston Globe revealed the program, officials agreed Monday to brief Congress this week.

Travelers gather on benches to wait for delayed and arriving flights as others rush to their gate at the Fort LauderdaleÐHollywood International Airport on Friday, June 29, 2018, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The TSA projected that Friday would be its busiest day ever, with agents screening more than 2.7 million people. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Welcome to the ‘Quiet Skies’

Federal air marshals have begun following US citizens not suspected of a crime or on any terrorist watch list and collecting extensive information about their movements and behavior.