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Lance Armstrong rejects USADA interview

AUSTIN, Texas — Lance Armstrong will not do a tell-all interview under oath with the agency that exposed his performance-enhancing drug use and stripped him of his seven Tour de France titles.

The US Anti-Doping Agency had told Armstrong he would have to reveal all he knows about doping in cycling if he wanted to reduce his lifetime ban from sports.

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Wednesday was the latest deadline for Armstrong to decide on the USADA’s offer. After negotiating with the agency for two months, he refused.

Armstrong attorney Tim Herman said the cyclist ‘‘will not participate in USADA’s efforts to selectively conduct American prosecutions that only demonize selected individuals while failing to address the 95 percent of the sport over which USADA has no jurisdiction.’’

USADA chief executive Travis Tygart said the agency had expected Armstrong would agree to talk and would be ‘‘moving on’’ without him.

‘‘Over the last few weeks he has led us to believe that he wanted to come in and assist USADA, but was worried of potential criminal and civil liability if he did so,’’ Tygart said. ‘‘Today we learned from the media that Mr. Armstrong is choosing not to come in and be truthful and that he will not take the opportunity to work toward righting his wrongs in sport.’’

Herman said Armstrong is willing to participate in an international effort to clean up cycling, an effort that has broken down due to spats between the International Cycling Union and the World Anti-Doping Agency.

‘‘He will be the first man through the door, and once inside will answer every question, at an international tribunal formed to comprehensively address pro cycling, an almost exclusively European sport,’’ Herman said.

The USADA wants to question Armstrong under oath about whether cycling officials helped him cover up positive drug tests during his career, charges he continues to deny.

Last year, the USADA released a report that detailed extensive doping on Armstrong’s Tour de France-winning teams. Armstrong then admitted last month in an interview with Oprah Winfrey that he doped.

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