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Names and Notes

Few stars come out in St. Louis

St. Louis’ beloved baseball stars, including Hall of Fame shortstop Ozzie Smith, were on hand Saturday for Game 3 of the World Series, but non-sports celebrities were much harder to spot.

Tannen Murray/EPA

St. Louis’ beloved baseball stars, including Hall of Fame shortstop Ozzie Smith, were on hand Saturday for Game 3 of the World Series, but non-sports celebrities were much harder to spot.

ST. LOUIS — This city is the cradle of countless celebrities, from Chuck Berry and Linda Blair to Marsha Mason and Masters and Johnson. So why, when the Cardinals play in the World Series, are there so few famous fans among the multitudes at the house that Budweiser built?

Consider this: Colbie Caillat, who had a hit in 2007 with a confection called “Bubbly,” performed the national anthem before Game 3 of the World Series Saturday – and Caillat is from Malibu, which, last we checked, is a long way from Missouri.

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At least St. Louis’s baseball bona fides were acknowledged before the game, with Hall of Fame greats Lou Brock, Bob Gibson, Ozzie Smith, and Red Schoendienst assembled on the field.

Then again, it’s easy to be anonymous in St. Louis, as Red Sox general manager Ben Cherington discovered Saturday morning. We spied Cherington and his wife, Tyler Tumminia, strolling the empty streets downtown together after a run, and the couple might as well as have been invisible as they waited in line afterward for mochaccinos at Park Avenue Coffee on 10th Street.

We were told to keep an eye out at the game for actors John Goodman and Billy Bob Thornton, who are both big Cardinals fans and occasionally go to games.

And then there’s Jenna Fischer, who plays Pam on “The Office.” She was raised in suburban St. Louis, and our drinking buddy at the Over/Under Grille told us she sometimes puts on red and roots for the Cardinals. No luck.

So who was there? Andy Cohen, the host of Bravo’s “Watch What Happens Live” and former Maine Senator George Mitchell.

So we wandered over to The Loop, which is home to St. Louis’s walk of fame, a series of brass stars in the sidewalk honoring famous natives of the city.

There’s Maya Angelou, Tennessee Williams, Tina Turner, Miles Davis, and T.S. Eliot. If you’re looking for Berry, he’s close to Bob Costas, next to Nelly, and just a few feet from the front door of Blueberry Hill, a bar/restaurant that has been a hangout for generations of rockers and R&B singers. (The walls are lined with photos of visiting dignitaries ranging from James Brown and Paul McCartney to Chaka Khan and Isaac Hayes.)

Across the street, we ran into 23-year-old Alaric Lopez, who was using the World Series to make a little money. Lopez put his Royal typewriter on a makeshift table, and propped a piece of cardboard advertising “Poet for Hire.”

“I write poems in exchange for donations,” he said. “I think the World Series is going to be good for business.”

Mark Shanahan can be reached at Shanahan@Globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @MarkAShanahan
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