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When a team wins the World Series, it enhances the value of everybody who played a role. That includes members of the front office.

For the Red Sox, a month without even the slightest turbulence ended Wednesday when senior vice president of player personnel Allard Baird left to join the New York Mets.

The 57-year-old Baird will be a vice president and assistant GM for scouting and player development under new general manager Brodie Van Wagenen.

Baird ended a 12-year tenure with the Red Sox that started in 2006 when Theo Epstein hired him as a special assignment scout. The New Hampshire native added further responsibilities under Ben Cherington in 2011 and Dave Dombrowski in 2015.

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At various points in his time with the Sox, Baird ran the pro scouting department and worked to get the team a foothold in Cuba. He also served as a mentor to many younger executives.

But this move allows him to become essentially second in command, something he was not with the Sox.

“I’m thrilled to join the Mets and am ready for this opportunity to help build the Mets into perennial contenders,” Baird said in a release from the Mets.

Van Wagenen, a former agent, needed experienced aides with the Mets. Baird, who was GM of the Kansas City Royals from 2000-06, will be part of his inner circle.

“Allard has a championship résumé and played a key role in helping the Red Sox win three World Series titles. He will be a great resource to myself and our entire baseball operations department,” Van Wagenen said.

With the Sox, Bard was part of the team’s decision-making group under Dombrowski. But his position will not be filled.

“You never like to lose a good baseball man. But this was a great opportunity for Allard,” Dombrowski said. “His responsibilities will be filled internally by members of our organization.”

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Senior vice president of player personnel Frank Wren and executive vice presidents Brian O’Halloran and Eddie Romero remain in place. O’Halloran and Romero were promoted earlier this month.

Dombrowski also has much faith in vice president of player personnel Jared Banner and pro scouting director Gus Quattlebaum.

World premiere

Major League Baseball will host the premier of “The 2018 World Series: Damage Done” on Monday night at the Emerson Colonial Theater.

The documentary, produced by MLB Network, includes behind-the-scenes footage and exclusive sound clips from the 14-game postseason run by the Red Sox.

Uzo Aduba, the Emmy Award-winning star of the Netflix series “Orange is the New Black,” narrates the 80-minute production. Aduba is from Medfield, graduated from Boston University, and is a lifelong Sox fan.

Dombrowski, manager Alex Cora, and team president Sam Kennedy are among the Sox personnel expected to attend.

Tickets will cost you

The June 29-30 games in London between the Yankees and Red Sox will cost a king’s ransom.

The Associated Press reported the top seats are 385 pounds, or $493. The next level of seating drops only to $410. The cheapest seats, in the second deck of Olympic Stadium, will be $38.

A presale for Yankees and Red Sox season ticket-holders starts Friday. The general sale starts Dec. 6.

Gammons honored

Former Globe baseball writer Peter Gammons will be inducted into the Cape Cod League Hall of Fame on Saturday at Chatham Bars Inn.

Gammons, who won the Baseball Hall of Fame’s Spink Award in 2004, is a three time national sportswriter of the year and longtime supporter of the Cape Cod League.

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The league also will honor former Red Sox righthander Craig Hansen, a star with Harwich before he was a first-round pick in 2005.

The other inductees are Framingham native Mark Sweeney, who led Yarmouth-Dennis to consecutive championships in 1989-90 before playing 14 years in the majors; longtime Chatham manager John Schiffner; and Longmeadow resident Ace Adams, who pitched three years in the Cape League before starting a long career in baseball.

Barbara Ellsworth, a league executive board member and Y-D executive, will be inducted posthumously.


Peter Abraham can be reached at pabraham@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @PeteAbe.