Boston Marathon

Survivor says memorial was placed in wrong spot: ‘Nice work, Boston’

Adrianne Haslet-Davis at the Boston Marathon at the finish line in 2014.
John Tlumacki/Globe Staff/File
Adrianne Haslet-Davis at the Boston Marathon at the finish line in 2014.

Adrianne Haslet-Davis, a Boston Marathon bombing survivor who lost a leg in the 2013 attack, said that a memorial wreath honoring victims and survivors was placed in the wrong spot this weekend.

Haslet-Davis took to Instagram Saturday to show her frustration, posting a video showing a large wreath flanked by floral arrangements in front of the Starbucks at 755 Boylston Street.

One of the blasts occurred outside what was then Forum Restaurant, which sat next to the Starbucks.

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“Nice work, Boston. Real, real good job of laying the wreath in front of the wrong place,” Haslet-Davis said sarcastically in the video. “Nice work. That’s real offensive to everyone. Appreciate it. It’s cool. So glad I came down to see this.”

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As the video came to a close, Haslet-Davis could be heard cursing at the situation.

In a caption accompanying the video, Haslet-Davis said that her offensive language was “valid.”

“How Boston Strong are you?” she wrote. “I bet if we had a permanent memorial people would remember where the actual attack happened. #sooffended”

(It was announced later this weekend that city officials plan to unveil two stark monuments next April marking the location of the acts of terror on Boylston Street.)

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Haslet-Davis said she ended up moving the wreath herself, posting another video to Instagram with a caption that included the hashtags “#sooffended” and “icriedalot.”

MOVED. IT. . . . . #forumrestaurant #sooffended #icriedalot #dothepossible

A post shared by Adrianne Haslet (@adriannehaslet) on

The Instagram posts came after two Saturday morning wreath-laying ceremonies at the sites of the blasts — the first at 671 Boylston St. and the second at 755 Boylston St. The family of Martin Richard placed a wreath at site of the second of two blasts; the family of Krystle Campbell placed a similar wreath at the other spot.

People who were wounded in the Marathon bombings, along with Mayor Martin J. Walsh and Governor Charlie Baker, were present for the Saturday commemoration.

A spokesperson for Walsh’s office said the wreath was laid on the righthand side of the former Forum Restaurant during the ceremony.

It is unclear why the wreath was moved further to the right, effectively placing it in front of Starbucks.

Governor Charlie Baker and his wife with the family of Marathon bombing victim Krystle Campbell during the wreath-laying ceremony Saturday morning.
Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff
Governor Charlie Baker and his wife with the family of Marathon bombing victim Krystle Campbell during the wreath-laying ceremony Saturday morning.

Family members of Marathon bombing victim Martin Richard arrived to place a wreath at 755 Boylston St. during a ceremony on Saturday.
Michael Dwyer/AP
Family members of Marathon bombing victim Martin Richard arrived to place a wreath at 755 Boylston St. during a ceremony on Saturday.

A wreath was placed in front of Marathon Sports on Saturday.
John Tlumacki/Globe staff
A wreath was placed in front of Marathon Sports on Saturday.

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Haslet-Davis ran the Boston Marathon last year, drawing praise from the likes of Tom Brady.

Haslet-Davis was injured in the 2013 Marathon bombings. Haslet-Davis’ injuries were severe enough that doctors had to amputate her lower left leg.

A dance instructor at Boston’s Arthur Murray Dance Studio at the time of the blast, Haslet-Davis refused to allow her injuries to stop her, and by the following spring, she was using a special prosthetic leg made for her at the MIT Media Lab.

She’s continued to work to return to dancing — including one memorable performance filmed during a Ted Talk in 2014.

Globe correspondent John Hilliard contributed to this report.