Front page

Co-owner of pharmacy blamed for outbreak stays silent at hearing

Pharmacy co-owner Barry Cadden invoked the Fifth Amendment before a House panel.

Barry Cadden, co-owner of the firm blamed for the meningitis outbreak, repeatedly exercised his right not to incriminate himself before a House panel.

Shutdown spurs hunt for medication sources

Hospitals and the government are trying to ensure an uninterrupted supply of critical drugs after the disclosure of problems with sterility procedures at Ameridose.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2012/11/15/BostonGlobe.com/National/Images/2012-11-14T212101Z_01_TOR312R_RTRMDNP_3_USA-GENERALS--90x90.jpg Paula Broadwell fell short of aims at Harvard

The biographer with whom former CIA ­director David Petraeus had an affair abandoned her bid for a doctorate from Harvard in 2007.

President Obama warned congressional Republicans he was ready to fight for his selection for secretary of state.

Obama rips critics of UN ambassador

The president aggressively defended Ambassador Susan Rice from Republican charges she misled the public on the Libya attacks.

Brogan Graham cheered on Kate Kennedy during a workout at Harvard Stadium.

November Project members embrace exercise, one another

Hundreds of locals are turning out three times a week at 6:30 a.m. to hug and socialize before running stadium steps, or knocking out a series of sit-ups and push-ups.

The Nation

Obama rips critics of UN ambassador

President Obama warned congressional Republicans he was ready to fight for his selection for secretary of state.

By Matt Viser

The president aggressively defended Ambassador Susan Rice from Republican charges she misled the public on the Libya attacks.

Paula Broadwell fell short of aims at Harvard

Davis Petraeus (left) and  Paula Broadwell

By Callum Borchers, Tracy Jan and Bryan Bender

The biographer with whom former CIA ­director David Petraeus had an affair abandoned her bid for a doctorate from Harvard in 2007.

Rare mutation found to increase Alzheimer’s risk

By Gina Kolata

The discovery of the mutated gene, researchers say, provides clues to how and why Alzheimer’s disease progresses.

The World

Israeli strikes on Gaza kill Hamas official

Israel hit at least 20 targets in Gaza on Wednesday, and it warned Hamas leaders to stay out of sight in the coming days.

By Fares Akram and Isabel Kershner

Israel launched the most ferocious assault on Gaza in four years after persistent rocket fire, hitting at least 20 targets in attacks that killed the top military commander of Hamas.

UN failed Sri Lankans, report says

By PETER JAMES SPIELMANN

A UN report said inadequate efforts by the world body to protect civilians during the final months of Sri Lanka’s civil war were a failure that led to suffering for hundreds of thousands of people.

Mali militants say they will not give up harsh law

By BRAHIMA OUEDRAOGO

The militants’ stance appears to offer little ground in last-ditch talks meant to avert a military intervention to take back the region in northern Mali.

Editorial & Opinion

Opinion: Juliette Kayyem

The GOP’s ‘Hispanic problem’

Undocumented people filled out applications in Chicago in August for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

By Juliette Kayyem

Republicans are using a multi-faceted approach in their search for a way to soften the party’s hard edge on immigration.

joan vennochi

John Kerry should be secretary of state

By Joan Vennochi

Kerry has experience, has been a loyal Obama supporter, and importantly, doesn’t have baggage as the president searches for a secretary of state.

edward l. glaeser

Help New York rebuild, but fix FEMA, too

By Edward L. Glaeser

FEMA’s insurance programs need an overhaul so that they don’t encourage building in high-risk areas.

More Stories

Letters | DEBATE OVER FREEDOM, BIAS AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY

Flap raises dilemma of refusing to tolerate intolerance

letters | DEBATE OVER FREEDOM, BIAS AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY

Campus clubs ought to be spared a dip in the melting pot

letters | A ROMNEY ROLE IN THE ADMINISTRATION?

Obama’s ill treatment of challenger still aches

letters | A ROMNEY ROLE IN THE ADMINISTRATION?

Right-wing brand of economics has no place at White House

Metro

Co-owner of pharmacy blamed for outbreak stays silent at hearing

Pharmacy co-owner Barry Cadden invoked the Fifth Amendment before a House panel.

By Liz Kowalczyk and Kay Lazar

Barry Cadden, co-owner of the firm blamed for the meningitis outbreak, repeatedly exercised his right not to incriminate himself before a House panel.

Yvonne Abraham

The nightmare long before Christmas

By Yvonne Abraham

Whether we like it or not, we’re trapped in seasonal Turducken of three holidays in one, and ’tis already the season to be jolly.

Shutdown spurs hunt for medication sources

The Ameridose facvility in Westborough.

By Carolyn Y. Johnson

Hospitals and the government are trying to ensure an uninterrupted supply of critical drugs after the disclosure of problems with sterility procedures at Ameridose.

Business

Boston area’s small businesses cautious, but optimistic

By Todd Wallack

Most small-business owners in Greater Boston expect revenues to rise in 2013, and many expect to hire more workers, a survey found.

Tech Lab

Samsung, Nokia phones turn the tables on Apple

Samsung’s Galaxy Note II recognizes notes that are handwritten on its screen via a built-in stylus, and runs the latest version of Google’s Android operating system.

By Hiawatha Bray

Samsung’s Galaxy­ Note II is a massive marvel with a monster screen and all-day battery life. Nokia’s Lumia 810 is attractive and runs Windows Phone 8.

Franchisees riled over Upper Crust’s discount vouchers

Upper Crust executives, after paying themselves, laid off about 140 workers as part of the Monday night shutdowns.

By Jenn Abelson

Upper Crust franchisees complained that the pizza chain sold thousands of discount vouchers without their knowledge and kept the proceeds.

More Stories

Sandy, consumer caution put a dent in retail results

By Anne D’Innocenzio and Christopher S. Rugaber

Market Movers

Teen retailer’s sales strengthen

By Anne D’Innocenzio and Michelle Chapman

| Michelle Singletary

For many, Thanksgiving Day sales are a turkey of an idea

By Michelle Singletary

Obituaries

Thomas McCraw, economist and biographer; 72

THOMAS K. McCRAW

By J.M. Lawrence

Dr. McCraw brought economic theory and business practices to life in the classes he taught at Harvard University and through his books.

Will Barnet, printmaker and painter; at 101

Will Barnet’s self-portrait, an oil-on-canvas, made in 1981.

By Ken Johnson

The printmaker and painter was known for elegantly stylized portraits and classically composed visions of beautiful women and children.

Marshall Bouldin, 89, artist had work in White House

President Nixon, with his wife, Pat, admired a small painting of their daughters, Julie and Tricia, along with a larger version created by portrait artist Marshall Bouldin in 1970.

The portrait artist’s paintings have been displayed in the White House and more than 400 public and private collections throughout the country.

Sports

Celtics 98, Jazz 93

Rajon Rondo injures ankle in Celtics’ win

Rajon Rondo tries to stretch out his right ankle after suffering a sprain in the third quarter. He did not return.

By Frank Dell’Apa

Rondo left late in the third quarter, but the Celtics proved they can perform without him as Leandro Barbosa fueled the offense.

on basketball

Leandro Barbosa sparks Celtics past Jazz

Jeff Green (left), Kevin Garnett, and Leandro Barbosa came together in the second half and held off the Jazz.

By Gary Washburn

Leandro Barbosa was 4 for 5 shooting taking over for Rajon Rondo for 9 of his 16 points.

Andrew Luck part of a golden era for rookie QBs

Andrew Luck has stood tall at the Indianapolis helm, and his next assignment comes Sunday in Foxborough.

By Michael Whitmer

The No. 1 overall pick, who brings the 6-3 Colts to Foxborough on Sunday, is one of a wave of young QBs who now enter the league more ready to play than ever.

More Stories

celtics notebook

Rajon Rondo’s status up in the air

By Frank Dell'Apa

Yale at Harvard | Saturday, noon

Yale hopes to salvage season at Harvard

By John Powers

Patriots notebook

Aqib Talib makes his Patriots debut

By Michael Vega

Division 3 girls’ soccer semifinals

Weston girls topple Norwell in soccer

By Coryn Doncaster

emass division 2 field hockey

Watertown defeats Apponequet in field hockey tournament

By Colleen Casey

Volleyball Roundup

Barnstable defeats Lincoln-Sudbury in vollleyball

By Liz Torres and Nick French

Division 1 Boys’ soccer semifinals

Needham ends Somerville run in boys’ soccer

By Craig Forde

Division 2 boys’ soccer semifinals

Fast start drives Medway past North Andover

By Patrick McHugh

Division 3 boys soccer

Watertown defeats Dover-Sherborn in boys’ soccer

By Andy Deossa

Division 1 field hockey semifinals

Acton-Boxboro ends Walpole’s perfect season in field hockey

By Colleen Casey

NHL, players not talking

By Ira Podell

Division 1 girls’ soccer semifinals

Franklin girls blank Beverly, 2-0, to reach Division 1 final

By Seth Lakso

Division 2 girls’ soccer semifinals

Medfield defeats Belmont in girls’ soccer, 5-1

By Tim Healey

G: Style

Home, for the long run

Joseph Lynch and Kristin Miller in a wheelchair-accessible hallway in their recently renovated vacation home in the Berkshires.

By Linda Matchan

Some forward-thinking baby boomers are making accessibility modifications to their homes before they need them.

TELEVISION REVIEW

‘Crossfire Hurricane’: Becoming the Rolling Stones

From left: Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood, and Charlie Watts in HBO’s “Crossfire Hurricane.”

By Matthew Gilbert

Keith Richards and the other Rolling Stones recall their early years, from 1962 to 1978, as an otherworldly blur of nonstop drugs, alcohol, touring, and fan worship.

BOOK REVIEW

‘Young Philby’ by Robert Littell

By Alan Cheuse

Of all the portraits of spies in novels, stories, biographies, and histories, the treatments of Harold “Kim” Philby seem to fascinate us the most.

More Stories

Business casual

Boston Ballet’s off-stage chic

By Rachel Raczka

Bargain Bin

Fall clearance sale on at Wheelworks

By Ami Albernaz

Party Lines

Party Lines

Boston-area to do list

By Milva DiDomizio

Boston-area family events

By Milva DiDomizio

Boston-area nightlife events

By Milva DiDomizio

Mark your calendar

By June Wulff

Critic’s corner: Nov. 15

By Matthew Gilbert

Annie's Mailbox

Ask Amy column

Names

New Boston comedy club announced

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Amy Poehler makes the scene on foot

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Harry Agganis documentary screens

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Movie review

Sun mercifully sets on ‘Twilight’

By Wesley Morris

Names

ICA opens ’80s show with a party

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Tom Brokaw to receive Ken Burns award

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Zagats honor 30 under 30 in Boston

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Globe North

Tour provides a taste of Salem history

George Carey, founder of Finz Seafood & Grill, serves raw oysters to (from left) Charlene Peters, Heather Cathcart, and Jen DiSciullo.

By Joel Brown

Salem Food Tours opened for business in September, offering tours of local culinary hotspots for up to a dozen people, both tourists and locals.

Winchester

Parents question Winchester school redistricting plan

By Brenda J. Buote

A divided Winchester School Committee approved a map-based model that would change the school assignments for hundreds of the town’s elementary students next September.

Woburn

New memorial honors all of Woburn’s war veterans

About 5,000 people turned out Sunday for the unveiling of the Woburn Honor Roll listing the city’s veterans.

By John Laidler

The city dedicated a new memorial on Sunday that contains the names of 11,665 residents who have served in the military during times of war from the 17th century to today.

Globe South

A Spanish course for native speakers

At Dedham High School, Alison Reilley teaches the Spanish for Native Speakers class, an elective that focuses on culture and immigration.

By Natalie Feulner

The Spanish for Native Speakers course at Dedham High is an innovative attempt to help native Spanish speakers learn more about Spanish. 

Cohasset

Cohasset employee alleges age discrimination

By Johanna Seltz

A 64-year-old former Cohasset employee has filed a complaint with the state alleging that because of his age he was stripped of his duties and treated poorly.

Canton

Canton solar field still opposed by electrical union

The solar field could bring about $16 million to Canton over 25 years, say officials.

By Meg Murphy

The energy plant opened to praise from state and local officials in late summer, but it continues to draw criticism from the union, whose members did not get the installation job.

Globe West

When disaster strikes, Medical Reserve Corps springs into action

EMT AndrewGleckel demonstrates CPR during a basic training session for Medical Reserve Corps volunteers held last month in Weston.

By Kathleen Burge

The Medical Reserve Corps of Region 4A started as part of a national effort to create a system of regional public health networks for emergencies in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Newton

Newton divinity school increases security after reported rape

By Deirdre Fernandes

The school will be adding lampposts on campus and installing additional lights in its buildings, and is exploring whether to install blue-light emergency phones.

Waltham

Blasting extended at former Polaroid property

The old Polaroid building being torn down as seen from Rt 128.

By Scott Van Voorhis

Daily blasting to clear rock and ledge from the construction site along Route 128 will continue into the Spring.