Front page

For majority of workers, vacation days go unused

Nearly 70 percent of North American workers don’t take all of their annual allotted days off, according to a recent survey.

Fewer immigrants in N.E. held for deportation

The number of immigrants jailed for deportation in the region plunged last year, despite the expansion of a controversial program.

Match Charter Public High School on Commonwealth Avenue.

Lane Turner/Globe Staff

Some chafe at charter school’s low pay for tutors

A dispute over the minimal pay at Match Charter School in Boston offers a rare glimpse into labor unrest at a charter school.

A marker tells the story near Boston College’s Conte Forum, where Martin J. Walsh will be sworn in as Boston mayor.

Matthew J. Lee/Globe staff

Walsh pushes inauguration ceremony to city’s edge

Boston College’s Conte Forum, where Mayor-elect Martin Walsh will be inaugurated, so narrowly skirts the city limits that its address is listed as Chestnut Hill.

Then-Brandeis University president Jehuda Reinharz in 2006.

Brandeis may alter pay policy for leaders

The university’s board of trustees is considering revamping its compensation policies after an uproar over pay to its former president.

The Nation

Health website handles surge of sign-ups as deadline nears

By Josh Lederman

A December surge propelled health care sign-ups through the government’s rehabilitated website past the 1 million mark, the Obama administration said.

A majority in Senate could be in sight for GOP

Paul Broun (left) and Jack Kingston are GOP rivals in Georgia.

By Donna Cassata

Republicans are eyeing many Senate seats in 2014, but also face a challenge with the Tea Party.

N.Y. gun charges increase with new law

Gun rights advocates demonstrated in Albany, N.Y., in February against the provisions of a new state gun law.

By Michael Virtanen

Arrest data show more than 1,000 gun possession charges in New York City were boosted from misdemeanors to felonies because of the changes.

The World

Russian city hit by 2 bombings in 2 days

Sunday’s blast was near metal detectors, suggesting an attack deeper inside the rail station may have been averted.

By Steven Lee Myers

A suicide attack at a railroad station followed by a blast in a trolley bus the next day raised the specter of a new wave of terrorism just six weeks before the Winter Olympics.

Saudis give Lebanon $3b to buy weapons, bolster army

By Ryan Lucas

Lebanon’s president, who made the surprise announcement in a televised national address, did not provide any further details.

Israel hit by rocket fired from Lebanon, returns fire

By Isabel Kershner

The Israeli military said that five rockets were launched and one appeared to have landed in an open area near the Israeli border town of Kiryat Shimona.

Editorial & Opinion

JAMES CARROLL

Was Jesus ‘white’? Wrong question

Jesus Christ statue in Serra Negra, Brazil.

By James Carroll

If Christians had not forgotten that Jesus was a loyal son of Israel from birth to death, the history of the last 2,000 years would be very different.

opinion | Marcela García

Haitians without a nation

Louissien Pierra, 25, who was born in the Dominican Republic, held his 2-year-old daughter in November as they waited to board a bus to a Haitian town where they have family. Departures from the Dominican Republic to Haiti followed violence that erupted after a court ruling that could potentially revoke citizenship for residents of the Dominican Republic of Haitian descent.

By Marcela García

A ruling in the Dominican Republic has legalized retroactive denial of citizenship, affecting an estimated 200,000 Dominican citizens of Haitian descent.

opinion | Cathy Young

Pro-fat an unhealthy status quo

Over a third of Americans are now obese; nearly one in six are severely obese, with a BMI over 35.

By Cathy Young

Of course obese people should not be bullied; but neither should they be encouraged in the delusion that they are just fine.

Metro

Some chafe at charter school’s low pay for tutors

Match Charter Public High School on Commonwealth Avenue.

By James Vaznis

A dispute over the minimal pay at Match Charter School in Boston offers a rare glimpse into labor unrest at a charter school.

Walsh pushes inauguration ceremony to city’s edge

A marker tells the story near Boston College’s Conte Forum, where Martin J. Walsh will be sworn in as Boston mayor.

By Stephanie Ebbert

Boston College’s Conte Forum, where Mayor-elect Martin Walsh will be inaugurated, so narrowly skirts the city limits that its address is listed as Chestnut Hill.

Fewer immigrants in N.E. held for deportation

By Maria Sacchetti

The number of immigrants jailed for deportation in the region plunged last year, despite the expansion of a controversial program.

Business ǀ Science

For majority of workers, vacation days go unused

By Katie Johnston

Nearly 70 percent of North American workers don’t take all of their annual allotted days off, according to a recent survey.

Gene tests raise murky medical issues

Geneticists disagree about the uses of genome sequencing, but Harvard’s George Church says the worries are misplaced.

By Callum Borchers

Ten years after completion of the Human Genome Project made it possible to paint a full genetic portrait of anyone, sequencing remains far outside the mainstream.

The Hive

SmartBlinds ensure you’re not blinded

Model tugboats developed at Olin College use infrared sensors to navigate.

SmartBlinds aren’t on the market yet, but they were among the impressive innovations by Olin students at the school’s end-of-semester exposition.

Obituaries

Gordon Winston, 84; leading scholar on costs, benefits of college

Gordon Winston served as Williams College’s provost and the Orrin Sage professor of political economy.

By J.M. Lawrence

Dr. Winston once declared that a significant challenge facing those who invest in a college education is that they won’t know the results for years, if ever.

Harold Simmons; gave millions to GOP groups

Harold Simmons helped finance the Swift Boat attacks against John Kerry.

By Emma G. Fitzsimmons

Mr. Simmons was the billionaire who helped finance the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth attack ads against Senator John Kerry in the 2004 presidential election.

Wojciech Kilar, 81; pianist and prolific composer

Mr. Kilar wrote scores for many films, including ‘The Pianist.’’

By Monika Scislowska

Mr. Kilar, a Polish pianist, composed classical music and scores for many films, including Roman Polanski’s Oscar-winning “The Pianist.”

More Stories

Sports

Patriots 34, Bills 20

LeGarrette Blount, Patriots secure first-round bye

LeGarrette Blount looked back at Jim Leonhard after scoring on a 36-yard touchdown run in the second quarter.

By Shalise Manza Young

The Patriots sewed up the No. 2 seed in the AFC and a first-round postseason bye with a 34-20 win over the Bills at rain-soaked Gillette Stadium.

on football

Patriots’ toughness on display in win

Danny Amendola (right) celebrated LeGarrette Blount’s touchdown in the second quarter.

By Ben Volin

No team in the NFL was tougher this season than the Patriots, who endured more than their fair share of adversity.

Sox know value of mound depth

John Lackey is a great value for the Red Sox now that he is healthy after elbow surgery.

By Peter Abraham

With an apparent overabundance of starters, the Sox have to avoid making well-intentioned but harmful deal as they head into 2014.

More Stories

Christopher L. Gasper

The real season begins now for the Patriots

By Christopher L. Gasper

patriots notebook

Rain falls, but so do records for Stephen Gostkowski

By Michael Whitmer

Buffalo perspective | Jerry Sullivan

Bills need real change in culture

By Jerry Sullivan

Patriot Nation

They started by feasting on bison

By Anthony Gulizia

bettor’s edge

Some teams made something out of nothing

By Ed Ryan

Packers 33, Bears 28

Rodgers, Cobb connect in waning moments

By Andrew Seligman

Eagles 24, Cowboys 22

Eagles take NFC East title

By Schuyler Dixon

Saints 42, Buccaneers 17

Saints homed in on playoff spot

By Brett Martel

49ers 23, Cardinals 20

Phil Dawson’s last-second FG lifts Niners

By Bob Baum

Chargers 27, Chiefs 24 (OT)

Chargers claim final AFC playoff spot

By Bernie Wilson

Broncos 34, Raiders 14

Broncos clinch AFC’s top seed

By Josh Dubow

Bengals 34, Ravens 17

Bengals eliminate Ravens from playoff picture

By Joe Kay

Jets 20, Dolphins 7

Dolphins miss playoffs with loss

By Steven Wine

Steelers 20, Browns 7

Steelers stomp Browns, but miss out on playoffs

By Will Graves

Colts 30, Jaguars 10

Colts blow out Jaguars

By Michael Marot

Giants 20, Redskins 6

Giants add to Mike Shanahan, Redskins’ woes

By Tom Canavan

Titans 16, Texans 10

Titans triumph over demoralized Texans

By Teresa M. Walker

Panthers 21, Falcons 20

Panthers clinch NFC South

By Charles Odum

Vikings 14, Lions 13

Vikings win in Metrodome’s finale

By Dave Campbell

Seahawks 27, Rams 9

Seahawks clinch top seed

By Tim Booth

on basketball

Celtics’ forward Brandon Bass adjusts his game

By Gary Washburn

F1 legend Michael Schumacher critical after ski accident

By Sarah DiLorenzo and Geir Moulson

college hockey roundup

UMass-Lowell hockey prevails

G: Health

photography Review

When photographs are mirrors as well as windows

Photographs of Frances Clalin Clayton disguised as a Union officer and posing in a dress.

By Mark Feeney

The slipperiness of seeing, belief, and interpretation as pertains to race and identity is what inspires “The Mirror of Race: Seeing Ourselves through History.”

Book Review

‘If Only You People Could Follow Directions’ by Jessica Hendry Nelson

Jessica Hendry Nelson

By Judy Bolton-Fasman

Hendry Nelson is very much her own woman in these linked essays that take family dysfunction up the so-called “ladder of abstraction.”

Daily Dose

To beat performance anxiety, get excited

By Deborah Kotz

The Harvard Business School found that getting excited -- rather than relaxed -- about singing or speaking in public was a far more effective way to reduce performance anxiety.