Front page

Headed to Boston, marijuana firm admits to errors

A medical marijuana business planning to open in the Back Bay provided false data to state regulators in its license application.

Solar use will push energy costs up in Mass.

Customers could get hit with more than $1 billion in higher electricity bills over the next two decades under Governor Patrick’s plan.

Shirley Temple became a living example for children.

appreciation | ty burr

Much to applaud in Shirley Temple, then and now

The iconic child star offers a lesson in how to be famous while retaining one’s sanity, humanity, and perspective.

Vladimir Kimaev in protest park, where he said he was denied permission to demonstrate.

Mikhail Mordasov for the Boston Globe

Expect no protests in Sochi’s protest park

The official Winter Olympics protest park provides a concise example of how Russia’s authoritarian system tamps down dissent.

“It really opens up a breadth of conversation we haven’t had in the Commonwealth,” Suffolk Construction chief executive John Fish said.

Boston panel hears details on hosting Summer Olympics

A British diplomat described London’s experience in 2012 to a special committee looking at bringing the Games to Boston in 2024.

The Nation

House OK’s debt limit increase with no strings

Simply by holding the vote, Speaker John Boehner of Ohio effectively ended a three-year Tea Party-inspired era of budget showdowns.

By Jonathan Weisman and Ashley Parker

The House voted without conditions to raise the government’s borrowing limit until March 2015.

More questions on value of mammograms

By Deborah Kotz

Researchers conducted a trial that found that women who underwent yearly mammograms saw no added survival benefit.

Atlanta braces for possible ‘catastrophic’ storm

A truck plowed along Highway 75 near Helen, Ga., Tuesday. Sleet and freezing rain were expected overnight.

By Christina A. Cassidy

Atlanta-area residents heeded advice to stay home as a dangerous storm descended two weeks after a snowfall paralyzed the city.

The World

Relief efforts stall in Syrian city

By Barbara Surk

Aid workers made no gains in the besieged Syrian city of Homs, where a fragile truce is running out.

China, Taiwan hold first official talks since 1949

Wang Yu-chi, of Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council (left), greeted Zhang Zhijun, director of China’s Taiwan Affairs Office,

By Austin Ramzy

The meeting marked a symbolic development in the easing of the two sides’ longtime rivalry.

Iran berates US on anniversary of Islamic revolution

A woman in Tehran held a poster of Ayatollah Khomeini and Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

By Thomas Erdbrink

Iran celebrated the 35th anniversary of the Islamic revolution Tuesday, and the state media said millions participated.

Editorial & Opinion

JEFF JACOBY

Death for Tsarnaev is a matter of justice

By Jeff Jacoby

The death penalty for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is appropriate, even with the risk that he might become a martyr.

SCOT LEHIGH

Killing of giraffe in zoo may bring change

By Scot Lehigh

The outrage over the killing of a giraffe at the Copenhagen Zoo could be part of an evolution in the way people see and treat animals.

editorial

Obamacare study bodes well for health insurance market

As more people buy health insurance policies on Obamacare exchanges, there will be more flexibility in the labor market — and more innovation in insurance coverage.

More Stories

JOSHUA GREEN

Michael Sam is on his own

By Joshua Green

letters | natural gas in salem’s future?

Building Salem plant would be easy but wrong

letters | natural gas in salem’s future?

N.E. states should energy coordinate policy

letters | natural gas in salem’s future?

Renewable energy plan needed from power firm

letters | natural gas in salem’s future?

Company need to build a bridge to clean energy

Metro

Boston panel hears details on hosting Summer Olympics

“It really opens up a breadth of conversation we haven’t had in the Commonwealth,” Suffolk Construction chief executive John Fish said.

By Michael Levenson

A British diplomat described London’s experience in 2012 to a special committee looking at bringing the Games to Boston in 2024.

Headed to Boston, marijuana firm admits to errors

State health officials approved a license for Good Chemistry of Massachusetts at 364-368 Boylston St. in the Back Bay.

By Kay Lazar and Shelley Murphy

A medical marijuana business planning to open in the Back Bay provided false data to state regulators in its license application.

New cameras keep watch on MBTA buses

MBTA driver Abdenour Elmahil waited for passengers at the Broadway bus stop on a bus that was recently outfitted with a camera (above) and video monitor. The images are streamed to monitors in a T dispatch center.

By Martine Powers

The 225 high-tech cameras are paid for by a $6.9 million grant from the Department of Homeland Security.

More Stories

Adrian Walker

John Barros takes the economic reins

By Adrian Walker

Mayor Martin Walsh supports overdose antidote

By Meghan E. Irons and Billy Baker

Boston man faces gun charges again

By Jacqueline Tempera

Business

Solar use will push energy costs up in Mass.

State officials see the expanded production targets triggering a proliferation of solar power across the state.

By Jay Fitzgerald

Customers could get hit with more than $1 billion in higher electricity bills over the next two decades under Governor Patrick’s plan.

Mass. high on list of poor working women

Sayra Alemany high-fived daughter Ly’eisha, 7, for a job well done on her homework. Alemany enrolled in a Crittenton Women’s Union program in 2012 and is now studying radiology at Bunker Hill Community College.

By Erin Ailworth

Nearly half of the state’s low-income households are headed by single mothers struggling in low-wage jobs, a study shows.

Shirley Leung

Cruel and unusual gloating from vacationing friends

Ed Goode, a media buyer at Boston advertising agency Connelly Partners, spent Super Bowl weekend at the Ritz-Carlton in St. Thomas.

By Shirley Leung

Thursday’s forecast calls for another blast of winter — to be followed by a flurry of more beach photos from Facebook friends.

Obituaries

Shirley Temple Black, 85, America’s sweetheart

From 1935 to 1939 Shirley Temple was the most popular movie star, with Clark Gable a distant second.

By Aljean Harmetz

In the 1930s, the little girl reached a height of Hollywood stardom and worldwide fame that no other child has reached.

Sports

Expect no protests in Sochi’s protest park

Vladimir Kimaev in protest park, where he said he was denied permission to demonstrate.

By David Filipov

The official Winter Olympics protest park provides a concise example of how Russia’s authoritarian system tamps down dissent.

Shaun White fails to medal in halfpipe

With history on the line, a disappointed Shaun White, the favorite in halfpipe, failed to medal. “I could have played it safe but I wanted to win,’’ he said.

By Shira Springer

White’s pursuit of a third-straight halfpipe medal ended when he finished fourth. Iouri Podladtchikov of Switzerland won gold.

Memory of 1980 loss to US still stings for Russians

Vladislav Tretiak was the goalie of the 1980 Soviet team, and now heads the Russian Ice Hockey federation.

By Scott Thurston

Vladislav Tretiak was the goalie who lost to the US then, and is now the head of the Russian team trying to win gold on home ice.

G: Food

Increasing food prices spark trend of package downsizing

Edgar Dworsky, founder of Consumerworld.org, has been tracking companies’ not-so-subtle downsizing of their containers, keeping them close enough in size that consumers might not notice.

By Jane Dornbusch

Food manufacturers are not about to reduce prices, so that leaves downsizing of a different kind.

appreciation | ty burr

Much to applaud in Shirley Temple, then and now

Shirley Temple became a living example for children.

By Ty Burr

The iconic child star offers a lesson in how to be famous while retaining one’s sanity, humanity, and perspective.

Q&A

Robin Robertson’s vegan cookbook was ahead of the curve

By Glenn Yoder

When Robertson first released “Vegan Planet” in 2003, “vegan” was miles away from the culinary buzzword it is today.

More Stories

Sunday Supper

Dinner for your Valentine: shrimp two ways

By Karoline Boehm Goodnick

food | travel

In N.J., Mad Batter still serving up fun

By Chris Malloy

short order

Bee my valentine

A Tank Away

Take a break on winning campus in Storrs, Conn.

By Patricia Harris and David Lyon

events

Boston-area to do list

By June Wulff

Names

Red Sox maestro Charles Steinberg honored

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Sports reporter Mike Dowling is leaving Ch. 5

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Governor Patrick has role in ‘World’ events

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Edward Hopper paintings in Oval Office

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

Italian conductor Gatti to miss two months

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein

Names

‘Monuments Men’ cast at National Gallery

By Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein