Front page

The face in the waves

Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff

Jaimee was beloved. Jaimee was struggling. Then Jaimee was gone. Her family threw everything into solving the first mystery — who killed her. The second was so much harder. How could they live on without her?

Analysis

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2018/06/01/BostonGlobe.com/National/Images/AP_60175906917.jpg 50 years after RFK’s death, legacy endures

Robert Francis Kennedy, slain in Los Angeles 50 years ago this week, seems oddly alive today. His ideas and legacy remain fresh, vibrant, unsettling, and challenging.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2018/05/30/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/foodforthepoor.jpg Leading hunger relief charity challenged on its claim of low costs

Food for the Poor, critics say, greatly inflates its total donations by putting huge and questionable valuations on noncash gifts such as medicines.

MIT professor Patrick Winston said stories are “a fundamental differentiating capability of us humans. And machines don’t have it yet.”

David L. Ryan/Globe Staff

Toil and trouble: How ‘Macbeth’ could teach computers to think

A veteran artificial intelligence researcher at MIT hopes to map human thought by watching his computer try to read “Macbeth” and other literary works.

The Nation

Analysis

50 years after RFK’s death, legacy endures

Senator Robert F. Kennedy, surrounded by an enthusiastic crowd, campaigned in Philadelphia in April 1968.

By David M. Shribman

Robert Francis Kennedy, slain in Los Angeles 50 years ago this week, seems oddly alive today. His ideas and legacy remain fresh, vibrant, unsettling, and challenging.

President Trump’s lawyers seek to avert subpoena from Robert Mueller

President Trump.

By Michael S. Schmidt and Maggie Haberman

Trump’s lawyers claimed in a confidential letter that the president has unfettered authority over all federal investigations.

Trade war would cause casualties in US regions friendly to Trump

The EU is threatening to penalize Kentucky bourbon, something that Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, said had gotten his attention.

By Paul Wiseman

Farmers, dairy producers, distillers, and the employees of Harley-Davidson and Levi Strauss are in the line of fire.

The World

Egypt’s president begins 2nd term amid crackdown on dissent

Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi addressed parliament Saturday after he was sworn in for a second four-year term.

By Samy Magdy

Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi was sworn in for a four-year term after being reelected in a vote with no serious challengers.

Mattis accuses Beijing of intimidation in South China Sea

By Thomas Gibbons-Neff

The defense secretary recently disinvited the Chinese military from a large, multinational naval exercise this summer.

News analysis

Trump’s Korea plan echoes strategies tried in past

President Trump announced Friday that his summit with Kim Jong Un was back on.

By Mark Landler and David E. Sanger

The president likes to suggest that his predecessors left him the “mess” of a nuclear-armed North Korea.

Editorial & Opinion

EDITORIAL

Retiring more nuclear plants could hurt Mass. climate goals

PLYMOUTH, MA. 03 / 15 /2011: PILGRIM NUCLEAR POWER PLANT, Pilgrim Station is located a few miles down the coast from Plymouth Rock. Like many similar plants, it was constructed by Bechtel, and is powered by a General Electric reactor and generator. Built at a cost of $231 million in 1972 by Boston Edison is now owned and managed by Entergy Nuclear Generation Co. since 1999. ( David L Ryan / Globe Staff Photo ) SECTION : METRO SLUG : REPORTER :

Most of the state’s zero-carbon electricity comes from nuclear power, but the industry is endangered.

Renée Graham

Harvey Milk and the enduring power of brash visibility

Harvey Milk sits outside his camera shop in San Francisco shortly after his election in 1977.

By Renée Graham

As Boston’s Pride Week begins, a new biography depicts the life and activism of Harvey Milk.

JEFF JACOBY

If politics worked the way the Food Network works

Competitors on the Food Network’s “Chopped.”

By Jeff Jacoby

No insults, no filibusters, no vague and windy proposals. Why can’t election campaigns be more like the Food Network?

Metro

In Springfield, search for answers goes on

Investigators continued to work at the home and yard of Stuart Weldon on Page Boulevard on Friday.

By Jeremy C. Fox, Jerome Campbell and Evan Allen

Fearful families waited in dread for answers Saturday, wondering how an allegedly violent kidnapper had been allowed to walk this city’s streets.

Leading hunger relief charity challenged on its claim of low costs

The Food for the Poor website pictures children in need.

By Brian MacQuarrie

Food for the Poor, critics say, greatly inflates its total donations by putting huge and questionable valuations on noncash gifts such as medicines.

Toil and trouble: How ‘Macbeth’ could teach computers to think

MIT professor Patrick Winston said stories are “a fundamental differentiating capability of us humans. And machines don’t have it yet.”

By Andy Rosen

A veteran artificial intelligence researcher at MIT hopes to map human thought by watching his computer try to read “Macbeth” and other literary works.

Business & Tech

Boston will be the hub of the biotech universe starting Monday

More than 16,000 people from 74 countries will be in Boston for the 2018 BIO gathering.

By Jonathan Saltzman

More than 16,000 people from 74 countries are expected for the 2018 BIO convention, last held in Boston in 2012.

MICHELLE SINGLETARY | THE COLOR OF MONEY

Who should foot the bill on the first date?

A couple on a first date at a Cambridge establishment.

By Michelle Singletary

It can make for some very awkward moments.

Scott Kirsner | Innovation Economy

The secret to Boston’s innovation economy

By Scott Kirsner

We like our history in Boston, and you need to go back to the 1630s to understand the foundation of what exists today.

Sports

Ben Volin | On football

Will order be restored with Tom Brady’s presence at Patriots’ minicamp?

Tom Brady, looking fit, trim, and pliable as ever, slung a pass during the Best Buddies football charity game at Harvard Stadium Friday.

By Ben Volin

The message from Brady so far this spring has been clear: He’s doing the exact minimum required, and nothing more.

DAN SHAUGHNESSY

Local sports owners give off mixed signals . . . and other thoughts

Walpole, MA - 4/25/2018 - Robert Kraft, Chief Executive Officer of the New England Patriots speaks about his recent meeting with jailed rapper Meek Mill during a panel discussion on criminal justice reform at Walpole High. Also on the panel are Patriots president Jonathan Kraft, Middlesex Judge Gloria Tan, and others. - (Barry Chin/Globe Staff), Section: Sports, Reporter: (Correspondent), Topic: 26coalition, LOID: 8.4.1730071734.

By Dan Shaughnessy

Robert Kraft and Tom Werner seem to be contradicting themselves in light of recent events.

RED SOX 5, ASTROS 4

Brock Holt called Andrew Benintendi’s home run that rallied Red Sox past Astros

Boston Red Sox's Andrew Benintendi, center, celebrates with Jackie Bradley Jr. (19) after both scored on Benintendi's home run as Houston Astros catcher Max Stassi, right, looks down during the seventh inning of a baseball game Saturday, June 2, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

By Julian Benbow

Holt turned to Alex Cora and said, “Pitch up, home run, second deck.” And that’s exactly where Benintendi’s home run went.

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REVOLUTION 2, RED BULLS 1

Teal Bunbury, Revolution rally past Red Bulls

By Frank Dell’Apa

Stanley cup final

Capitals drop Knights to take 2-1 series lead

By Stephen Whyno

NICK CAFARDO I SUNDAY BASEBALL NOTES

What will teams be looking for before baseball’s trade deadline?

By Nick Cafardo

GARY WASHBURN | SUNDAY BASKETBALL NOTES

Celtics’ roster needs? Fortifying the bench

By Gary Washburn

GARY WASHBURN | SUNDAY BASKETBALL NOTES

Celtics’ roster needs? Fortify the bench and keep Marcus Smart, for starters

By Gary Washburn

KEVIN PAUL DUPONT I SUNDAY HOCKEY NOTES

Ex-Bruin Michael Thelven is living the Swede life

By Kevin Paul Dupont

SATURDAY’S SCHOOL ROUNDUP

Steve Hajjar lifts Central Catholic to fourth straight MVC title

By Matt Doherty

MIAA ALL-STATE GIRLS’ TRACK & FIELD CHAMPIONSHIP

Wellesley races off with MIAA All-State girls’ track crown

By P.J. Wright

MIAA BOYS’ ALL-STATE TRACK & FIELD CHAMPIONSHIP

Aiden Felty, Smith Charles top field in boys’ outdoor track and field championships

By Josh Schafer

Gary Washburn | On Basketball

The disdain and respect between the Cavaliers and Warriors

By Gary Washburn

Ideas

Ideas | Pasquale Toscano

Where are all the superheroes with disabilities?

By Pasquale Toscano

Superhero films have outsize importance for underdogs. Yet as today’s buff protagonists leap gracefully across the screen, they stir a deep ambivalence among people with disabilities.

Ideas | Pallavi Kottamasu

Were cannibals really so bad?

Long before President Trump talked about “rapists” or “animals,” the term “cannibals” defined the outer limit of humanity — and placed certain unfamiliar cultures outside of it.

By Pallavi Kottamasu

Long before President Trump talked about “rapists” or “animals,” the term “cannibals” defined the outer limit of humanity — and placed certain unfamiliar cultures outside of it.

Opinion | Alex Kingsbury

Robocalls aren’t just an annoyance. They’re an assault on the common good.

Robocalls aren’t just an annoyance. They’re an assault on the common good.

By Alex Kingsbury

If a foreign country jammed a national communications system, it’d rightly be considered an act of aggression. But as spambots ruin the phone system, we sit idly by.

More Stories

Ideas | Chris Kaposy

When prenatal tests hint at abortion

By Chris Kaposy

Ideas | Sage Stossel

Make way for venture capitalists

By Sage Stossel

Brainiac

Big Data: 1,496 studies

By Alex Kingsbury

Brainiac

Innovation of the Week: Funeral for robot dogs

By David Scharfenberg

Brainiac

Judges vs. climate change

By Kevin Lewis

Obituaries

Jill Ker Conway, 83, author and first woman to serve as Smith College’s president

Initiatives Dr. Conway pioneered as Smith’s president from 1975 to 1985 continue to open doors for women decades later.

By Bryan Marquard

Along with her groundbreaking role at Smith, she previously served as a vice president at the University of Toronto.

Allyn Ann McLerie, 91, veteran of Broadway, TV, and film

By Neil Genzlinger

Ms. McLerie’s versatility served her well on Broadway, in the dance-marathon movie “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?” (1969), and on television comedies.

Connie Kurtz, 81, gay rights advocate

Connie Kurtz (second from left) danced with her partner, Ruth Berman, after getting their marriage license in New York.

By Neil Genzlinger

Ms. Kurtz turned her coming out as a lesbian into a lifetime of activism with her wife, Ruth Berman.

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Sunday Arts

movies

Mindy Kaling on the set — and on campus

Mindy Kaling (third from left) in “Ocean’s 8” with (from left) Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett, Sarah Paulson, Awkwafina, Anne Hathaway, Rihanna, and Helena Bonham Carter.

By Meredith Goldstein

The actress talks about hanging with the cast of “Ocean’s 8” and inspiring the grads of Dartmouth College.

theater

Sexual assault allegations reverberate in Boston theater scene

Actor Evan Gambardella alleged that a theater blogger fondled him.

By Malcolm Gay

A freelance theater critic has been blacklisted by Boston-area theaters after an actor accused him of sexual assault.

Doc Talk

Gender-bending ballet, ground-breaking theater, and Burmese brothers

In “City of Jade,” Taiwan-based filmmaker Midi Z reunites with his estranged brother in Burma. Left: “Lorraine Hansberry: Sighted Eyes, Feeling Heart.”

By Peter Keough

Don’t miss these documentary screenings.

More Stories

Ty Burr

A guide to on-demand treasures

By Ty Burr

music review

Passion and poetry from saxophonist JD Allen

By Bill Beuttler

new england literary news | nina maclaughlin

Maine lobsters, Vermont hippies, and a prom for readers

By Nina MacLaughlin

story behind the book | kate tuttle

A tale of a dying man’s birthday, unapologetic in its Mexican-ness

By Kate Tuttle

Sips

It’s time to Smash N’ Dash

By Liza Weisstuch

fashion

Doing good by looking good

By Kara Baskin

Travel

Happy Father’s Day: New England getaways for Dad

The Exotic Driving Experience at the Thompson Speedway Motorsports Park in Connecticut will get Dad’s heart racing.

By Diane Bair and Pamela Wright

Give him an adventure he’ll really enjoy. We’ve sleuthed out some fun ones.

Christopher Muther

SkyCouch, where have you been?

Air New Zealand’s Skycouch service transforms three economy seats into a couch.

By Christopher Muther

Air New Zealand’s new offering is beer budget business class for those with Champagne tastes. The skies would be much friendlier if more airlines followed suit.

Summer music fests worth the drive

Trumpeter/vocalist/Juno Award-winner Bria Skonberg will headline the seventh annual New Bedford Jazz Fest on June 9.

By Lauren Daley

If last weekend’s Boston Calling has you jazzed, jump in the car and keep those good times rolling.

Real Estate

Which are you better off buying: old construction or new?

By Jon Gorey

From safer wiring to durable composite trim, many of the materials in use today are better, but some will last only a decade, if we’re lucky. | realestate.boston.com

What is it like to live in Cohasset?

By Rachel Lebeaux

Cohasset is seeing changes, such as larger, pricier homes being built where smaller ones once stood, and an infusion of young families that add vibrancy to the community. | realestate.boston.com

What kind of home does your money buy in Cohasset?

By Rachel Lebeaux

A market sample includes a post-and-beam contemporary for $889,000 and a stucco villa with a rental for $1.54 million. Search for more listings at realestate.boston.com.

Magazine

Perspective | Magazine

An open letter to Joe Kennedy III: Here’s how to run for president

Representative Joe Kennedy III responds to the State of the Union address in January. Facing page: Bobby Kennedy campaigning in 1968.

By Larry Tye

You’re the Kennedy with the best shot at the Oval Office. Look to your grandfather Bobby’s campaign strategy to get you there.

Dinner with Cupid

Blind date: ‘If there was a part I could redo, it would be the end’

How did an Uber driver and waiter factor into this date?

Comments

Letters to the editor of the Boston Globe Magazine

Readers weigh in on the importance of family members in hospital rooms, and an avocado toast recipe.

More Stories

Globe Magazine

Summer guide: Things to do around Boston and Cambridge

By Nicole DeFeudis and Emeralde Jensen-Roberts

On the Block

For sale: Wonderful one-bedrooms condos

By John Gorey

Love Letters

The downside to dating a younger man

By Meredith Goldstein

Connections | Magazine

The quirky cat who took care of dad

By Joyce Alla

Globe North

ON THE MOVE | BRION O’CONNOR

A new addition aims to boost bike racing week

By Brion O’Connor

This month, the fledgling New England Crit Week expands to five events with the addition of the Gran Prix of Beverly, the North Shore’s signature downtown cycling contest.

NOTEWORTHY

GlobeNorth: Noteworthy performances

By Matt Case

Malden’s Annie Woolley finished third overall for Fitchburg State in the 100-meter hurdles May 26 at the NCAA Division 3 Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Championships.

HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS’ GOLF

New to golf, Winchester’s Mandile likes taking control

By Matt Case

A relative newcomer to competitive golf, Winchester High’s Christine Mandile is making rapid strides.

More Stories

LOCAL FARE

A new addition to the Newburyport restaurant scene

By Coco McCabe and Doug Stewart

WEST NEWBURY

Page school robotics team on top of the world

By Linda Greenstein

Globe South

All the news that’s fit to read aloud

By Zipporah Osei

The Talking Information Center of Marshfield is hosting the first collaborative low-vision support group in the south suburbs.

A place for youngsters to roam and learn in nature

Opening in the fall will be The Cooperative Nature School at The Trustees Moose Hill Farm, led by Abigail Marsters, executive director of The Sharon Cooperative School.

By Jill Terreri Ramos

In a new nature preschool opening in Sharon this fall, children will spend half the time outside, in all kinds of weather, and will be encouraged to explore the landscape, visit animals, and walk trails.

Beverly Beckham

Looking up a new word, and seeing its monstrosity

Anni-Frid Lyngstad (second from left), a Norwegian-born Swedish singer from the pop group Abba (pictured), is also a child of Lebensborn, the most famous one.

By Beverly Beckham

Lebensborn. It means “Fountain of Life” or “Spring of Life,” and was a Nazi program designed by the Heinrich Himmler, the head of the German Gestapo and SS, to create a master Aryan race.

More Stories

BLOTTER TALES

Cleanliness can have its downside

By Emily Sweeney

HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS’ GOLF

First up for De Andrade: the Notre Dame Academy legacy

By Andrew Higginbottom

NOTEWORTHY

GlobeSouth: Noteworthy performances

By Andrew Higginbottom

Globe West

HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS’ GOLF

At Concord-Carlisle, a young golfer leads the way

By Nate Weitzer

By the age of seven, Gabrielle Shieh was playing in local Massachusetts tournaments; by nine, she was on the New England PGA junior circuit. Now 16, she is preparing for numerous national tournaments this summer,

NOTEWORTHY

GlobeWest: Noteworthy performances

By Nate Weitzer

Wayland’s Nick Barber of the MassBay men’s golf team finished first in the NCAA Men’s Golf Regional Championship May 25.

How one local high school teacher got his students to actually put away their phones

By Nancy Shohet West

A Marlborough High teacher discovered an old-school solution to a modern distraction.