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Ethnicity not a factor in Elizabeth Warren’s rise in law

Elizabeth Warren, the future senator, taught a class at University of Pennsylvania Law School in Philadelphia in the early 1990s.

Leif Skoogfors/Corbis via Getty Images

An exhaustive review bolsters Warren’s assertion that her claim to Native American heritage did not help her win academic jobs, even though there is evidence Harvard took advantage of it after she was hired.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2018/09/01/BostonGlobe.com/National/Images/Rex_Memorial_sevice_for_Senator_John_9843147AK.jpg John McCain is remembered as a hero, patriot, and inspiration

Barack Obama and George W. Bush were among the speakers, and a range of politicians, foreign leaders, and friends attended a memorial service at Washington’s National Cathedral.

Kissa Owens received a $1 million settlement from Springfield police when her son, 15-year-old Delano Walker Jr., was killed during a 2009 confrontation with police.

Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

‘I could crush your [expletive] skull and [expletive] get away with it.’ A deep look at the Springfield police

The Western Mass. city is facing an ugly new distinction as misconduct goes unchecked.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2018/09/02/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/5a41bc3c-b4b9-4bc4-8d3a-47b5083546a8-20011.jpg Clergy abuse scandal widens and deepens

The devastating grand jury report on Catholic clergy sex abuse in Pennsylvania has sent fresh tremors through Catholic communities across the country.

The Nation

Ethnicity not a factor in Elizabeth Warren’s rise in law

Elizabeth Warren, the future senator, taught a class at University of Pennsylvania Law School in Philadelphia in the early 1990s.

By Annie Linskey

An exhaustive review bolsters Warren’s assertion that her claim to Native American heritage did not help her win academic jobs, even though there is evidence Harvard took advantage of it after she was hired.

John McCain is remembered as a hero, patriot, and inspiration

Mandatory Credit: Photo by SHAWN THEW/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock (9843147ak) Former US President Barack Obama delivers remarks during Senator John McCain's memorial service at the Washington National Cathedral in Washington, DC, USA, 01 September 2018. Senator McCain died 25 August, 2018 from brain cancer at his ranch in Sedona, Arizona, USA. He was a veteran of the Vietnam War, served two terms in the US House of Representatives, and was elected to five terms in the US Senate. McCain also ran for president twice, and was the Republican nominee in 2008. Memorial sevice for Senator John McCain at the Washington National Cathedral, USA - 01 Sep 2018

By Peter Baker

Barack Obama and George W. Bush were among the speakers, and a range of politicians, foreign leaders, and friends attended a memorial service at Washington’s National Cathedral.

Clergy abuse scandal widens and deepens

By Mark Arsenault

The devastating grand jury report on Catholic clergy sex abuse in Pennsylvania has sent fresh tremors through Catholic communities across the country.

The World

Accusation against Pope Francis creates furor

A claim by a former top Vatican diplomat has led some conservatives to call for Pope Francis to resign.

By Laurie Goodstein and Jason Horowitz

Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò’s letter has drawn confusion and anger from many corners of Catholicism.

US agents tried to turn Russian oligarch into an informer

Pedestrians walk in front of the Spasskaya tower of the Kremlin (left) and St. Basil’s cathedral in Moscow earlier this year.

By Kenneth P. Vogel and Matthew Rosenberg

The attempt to flip Oleg Deripaska was part of a broader, clandestine US effort to gauge the possibility of gaining cooperation from roughly a half-dozen of Russia’s richest men.

Invisible weapon might be cause of diplomats’ illnesses

The Consulate General building of the United States in Guangzhou, China.

By William J. Broad

Strikes with microwaves, some experts argue, more plausibly explain the reports of painful sounds, ills, and traumas.

Editorial & Opinion

Editorial

Time’s up on Pope Francis and Catholic Church leaders being able to handle clergy abuse crisis

St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City, pictured on August 31, 2018.

Outside law enforcement needs to clean up the sexual abuse scandal that the church can’t.

JEFF JACOBY

In easing up on mileage rules, the Trump administration gets one right

Traffic in Los Angeles in 2012.

By Jeff Jacoby

The Trump administration’s rule will mean cars that are cleaner, safer, more fuel-efficient, and more affordable, with no discernible impact on air quality.

Renée Graham

Starting with Louis C.K., the creeps are creeping back into the spotlight

Louis C.K. was accused of sexual misconduct in 2017.

By Renée Graham

Yesterday’s #MeToo perpetrators are inching back toward the spotlight. Anyone short of Harvey Weinstein, it seems, can hope for redemption.

Metro

‘I could crush your [expletive] skull and [expletive] get away with it.’ A deep look at the Springfield police

Kissa Owens received a $1 million settlement from Springfield police when her son, 15-year-old Delano Walker Jr., was killed during a 2009 confrontation with police.

By Laura Crimaldi and Shelley Murphy

The Western Mass. city is facing an ugly new distinction as misconduct goes unchecked.

No excitement for the imminent gubernatorial election

By Joshua Miller

In conversations with 25 registered voters, one clear theme emerged: People are aware of Tuesday’s primary, but they are far from excited about it.

In Allston, it’s the annual move-in (and out) day. And it’s a circus

Meredith Santaus helped a friend, who is a Boston University student, move into an apartment on Linden Street in Allston.

By Jeremy C. Fox

Furniture, suitcases, and bewildered-looking parents lined the streets of Allston on Saturday as college students took part in an annual rite — it’s move-in day.

Business & Tech

MICHELLE SINGLETARY | THE COLOR OF MONEY

5 places to look for unclaimed money

By Michelle Singletary

Scams are out there, but there are some legitimate websites, too.

ON THE JOB

‘I like to say that everything I do is 100 percent fake’

Joe Cautela (right) of Hudson assisted magician David Hagerman with a rope trick at Canobie Lake Park in Salem, N.H., during a late August performance.

By Cindy Atoji Keene

Magician and science entertainer David Hagerman performs more than 600 shows a year.

Scott Kirsner | Innovation Economy

This Boston museum is off-limits to almost everyone

It’s not easy to get inside the Verizon Innovation in Communications Museum. In 2014, a costumed tour guide showed lucky visitors around.

By Scott Kirsner

Verizon’s Innovation in Communications space near City Hall celebrates Alexander Graham Bell, but good luck trying to get inside.

Sports

RED SOX 6, WHITE SOX 1

Eduardo Rodriguez gives Red Sox just what they have been missing

CHICAGO, IL - SEPTEMBER 01: Eduardo Rodriguez #57 of the Boston Red Sox pitches against the Chicago White Sox during the first inning at Guaranteed Rate Field on September 1, 2018 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jon Durr/Getty Images)

By Peter Abraham

The lefthander, making his first appearance since July 14, allowed one run in 5 innings and struck out 12.

DAN SHAUGHNESSY

Mark Leibovich on his new Patriots book: ‘I don’t know why the guys let me in the way they did’

Foxborough, MA 1-22-17: Pictured during the post game podium celebration are (left to right) Patriots owner Robert Kraft, head coach Bill Belichick, and quarterback Tom Brady. The New England Patriots hosted the Pittsburg Steelers in the National Football League AFC Championship Game at Gillette Stadium. (Globe Staff Photo/Jim Davis) reporter: mcbride topic: Patriots-Steelers

By Dan Shaughnessy

The book is a 349-page grenade guaranteed to rattle cages in Foxborough and across the NFL.

BEN VOLIN I ON FOOTBALL

What are the Patriots’ biggest weaknesses after initial roster cutdown?

New England Patriots tackle Marcus Cannon (61) warms up during the team's NFL football training camp in Foxborough, Mass., Friday, July 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

By Ben Volin

The roster churn will likely continue through next weekend.

More Stories

Tara Sullivan

Phil Mickelson is in an unfamiliar position

By Tara Sullivan

Revolution 1, Timbers 1

Revolution settle for tie, winless streak climbs to nine

By Nick Ironside

GARY WASHBURN | SUNDAY BASKETBALL NOTES

LeBron James just the beginning in Lakers’ plans for a renaissance

By Gary Washburn

NICK CAFARDO | SUNDAY BASEBALL NOTES

The A’s are the team you don’t want to face in the playoffs

By Nick Cafardo

KEVIN PAUL DUPONT I SUNDAY HOCKEY NOTES

Can 19-year-old Jack Studnicka make the Bruins?

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Yankees 2, Tigers 1

Masahiro Tanaka, Gleyber Torres spark Yankees’ win

By Scott Orgera

OHIO STATE 77, OREGON STATE 31

Without Urban Meyer, Ohio State routs Oregon State in opener

By Mitch Stacy

NASCAR | Darlington (S.C.) Raceway (Sunday 6 p.m., NBCSN)

Denny Hamlin captures pole at Darlington

By Pete Iacobelli

Dell Technologies notebook

Danny Ainge has rooting interest at the Dell

By Owen Pence

NICK CAFARDO | ON BASEBALL

Red Sox have a month to get their pitching in order

By Nick Cafardo

Ideas

Ideas | Chelsea Conaboy

The abortion debate doesn’t change, but the science of abortion does

The abortion debate doesn’t change, but the science of abortion does

By Chelsea Conaboy

The political lines defining the abortion fight have barely moved. But as a new battle looms, scientific advances could change everything.

Opinion | Semon Frank Thompson

Support the death penalty? Then assist with an execution

A law enforcement officer outside the Nebraska State Penitentiary in Lincoln, where Carey Dean Moore was scheduled to be executed on the morning of Aug. 14, 2018. Fentanyl, the opioid at the center of the nation’s overdose epidemic, was to be used here to carry out a death penalty in the United States for the first time. (Luke Franke/The New York Times)

By Semon Frank Thompson

If we are going to continue executing people, there should be a lottery system for those tasked with carrying it out.

Ideas | Nick Andersen

When you couldn’t bring technology to people, ambitious cities brought people to World’s Fairs

McNeven, J., The Foreign Department, viewed towards the transept, coloured lithograph, 1851, Ackermann (printer), V&A. The interior of the Crystal Palace in London during the Great Exhibition of 1851. CREDIT: Wikimedia Commons

By Nick Andersen

In an era before mass commercialization, it wasn’t easy to present new products to the public; the public had to travel to them. A forward-looking city could reap the benefits.

More Stories

Ideas | Beth Wolfensberger Singer

Making Bird scooters more Boston-friendly

By Beth Wolfensberger Singer

Opinion | Stephen Kinzer

Trump’s Space Force is a silly but dangerous idea

By Stephen Kinzer

Obituaries

Dr. Elizabeth Connell, 92, authority on contraception

Dr. Connell promoted improving women’s reproductive health for more than 50 years.

By Karen Weintraub

Dr. Connell had a longtime commitment to raising awareness about family planning and contraception.

Ellie Mannette, 90, father of the modern steel drum

By Karen Zraick

Mr. Mannette sought to elevate and expand the craft of steel-pan music, and to share it with the world.

Sunday Arts

Ty Burr

In movies as much as theater, Neil Simon was a conquering showman

Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau in the 1968 film “The Odd Couple,” written by Neil Simon based on his play of the same name.

By Ty Burr

Neil Simon was a master craftsman, taking lessons he had learned in the trenches of live and scripted 1950s TV and applying them to New York theater, American commercial cinema, and right back to television.

Shiny happy people give author Caroline Kepnes the creeps

Caroline Kepnes released her newest book, “Providence,” in June and visited Warwick, R.I., the following month to promote it.

By Meredith Goldstein

As fans of her novels know — and TV viewers will soon find out — the writer from Cape Cod is drawn to darkness.

Television

It’s his prerogative: Bobby Brown prepares to tell his story his way

Bobby Brown is the subject of BET’s “follow-up to “The New Edition Story.”

By James Sullivan

The singer talks about his BET biopic, the legacy of New Edition, and why he’d welcome a return of new jack swing.

More Stories

Critic’s notebook

Looking at Bach, as well as listening, at the MFA

By Mark Feeney

It’s a Thing

From a googling Trump to final respects for Aretha Franklin

By Michael Andor Brodeur

NAMES

Claire Danes and Hugh Dancy welcome baby boy

By the Associated Press

story behind the book | kate tuttle

Refreshing a pioneering transgender YA novel

By Kate Tuttle

new england literary news | nina maclaughlin

Writing poetry inspired by paintings; a journalist’s cancer memoir; a Peace First primer

By Nina MacLaughlin

bibliophiles

Falls in love with detectives

By Amy Sutherland

Buzzsaw

Is Netflix becoming un-binged?

By Matthew Gilbert

Doc Talk

Maine event and snapshots of Alabama

By Peter Keough

Travel

These are the best frequent flyer programs

By Justin Bachman

Roughly half of the people who belong to an airline loyalty program don’t understand how it works.

In New London, they never forget a traitor

Derron Wood, artistic director of Flock Theatre, and Victor Chiburis, assistant artistic director, take stock of this year’s effigy of Benedict Arnold.

By James Sullivan

This year Wood’s theater company presents its sixth annual “Burning of Benedict Arnold” festival on City Pier, as part of the Connecticut Maritime Heritage Festival.

Take the ‘Mystic Pizza’ tour

The downtown area of Mystic, Conn., includes Mystic Pizza.

By Gary Santaniello

Even 30 years later, most of the locations used for the cult classic 1988 film remain recognizable.

Real Estate

When Mom and Dad move out and you move in

By Kara Baskin

As any frustrated buyer will tell you, these days it helps to butter up a seller — and it’s that much easier if the seller happens to be Mom and Dad. | realestate.boston.com

Home of the Week: American Foursquare in Everett for less than $400,000

By John R. Ellement

The three-bedroom property has hardwood floors. Price: $399,900. Search the latest listings at realestate.boston.com.

Ask the Carpenter: Should I be worried about that cracked rafter?

By Rob Robillard

Ask the Carpenter’s Rob Robillard weighs in on how homes settle and how to check whether a holding tank is leaking.

Globe Local

Searching for stories of those who served

Names of those that served in WWII, at the Honor Roll Monument at the corner of Central and Church Streets in Byfield. The monument must be moved, because the church was sold and is now private property. Mark Lorenz for the Boston Globe.

By Linda Greenstein

Volunteers in Braintree and Byfield want to honor neighbors who fought in the first and second World Wars.

Lexington recalls the other shots heard ‘round the world’

By Nancy Shohet West

The town known for its role in the American Revolution is planning a centennial observance of the end of World War I.

SOUTH OF BOSTON

Quincy to unveil a park fit for patriots

02soquincypark -- Mayor Thomas P. Koch watches a test of the recently built fountain in August, 2018, in the new Hancock Adams Common. (Lisa Aimola/Office of the Mayor of Quincy)

By Jill Terreri Ramos

Hancock Adams Common will be a place of respite for residents, a place for tourists to learn about Quincy’s rich history, and a place for students from nearby Quincy College to gather.

More Stories

SUBURBAN DIARY

On Labor Day, a melancholy September song

By Rich Fahey

SOUTH INFORMER

A call for plays, touch-a-truck, and Head of the Weir River Race

By Morgan Hughes and Cynthia Fernandez

NOTEWORTHY

GlobeLocal: Noteworthy performances

By Joe Rice and Charlie Wolfson

HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER

Concord-Carlisle boys set to defend soccer title

By Charlie Wolfson