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The 30- and 40-somethings on Tuesday’s Democratic primary ballot are buoyed by a national trend, and their contests echo a generational divide in the party between its longtime stalwarts and upstart contenders, party members said.

David L. Ryan/Globe Staff/file

In primary and beyond, Democrats grapple with a generational divide

The 30- and 40-somethings on Tuesday’s Democratic primary ballot are buoyed by a national trend.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2018/09/01/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/tlumacki_bethlindstrom_metro265.jpg Candidates for governor, US Senate crisscross state in last-minute push before primary

Candidates spent the holiday weekend reminding voters that there’s an election — on Tuesday.

Under Trump, labor protections stripped away

President Trump and his appointees are steering policy in a decidedly employer-friendly direction.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2018/08/19/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/wiggs_Retreat_11.jpg On speck of land, drug recovery program looks to take root

The Penikese Island School wants to build a year-round residential center on an unpopulated island 14 miles from Woods Hole, a refuge for those fighting opioid abuse.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2018/08/29/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/greenhouse_31college-2_metro.jpg Who gets the better bed? As college freshmen move in, it’s turf war time

In an age when every aspect of dorm decor and etiquette can be pre-negotiated online, the bed is perhaps the last thing decided in real time.

The Nation

John McCain buried at Naval Academy alongside a longtime friend

Cindy McCain laid her head on the casket of her husband, Senator John McCain,  during a burial service at the US Naval Academy on Sunday.

By Susan Walsh

A horse-drawn caisson carrying the senator’s casket led a procession of mourners from the academy’s chapel to its cemetery following a private service.

Kavanaugh approval could transform the Supreme Court

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings begin Tuesday.

By Adam Liptak

The confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh would result in a rare replacement of the court’s swing justice, moving Chief Justice John Roberts — a much more reliably conservative vote than Kennedy — to the court’s ideological center.

GOP lawyer caught in crossfire on Kavanaugh, Russia probe

Bill Burck, a Republican attorney, has quietly played pivotal roles in several controversies in Washington.

By Lisa Mascaro

Republican insider Bill Burck is being pushed into the limelight by two of the biggest political dramas in Washington.

The World

‘Time for this war in Afghanistan to end,’ says departing US commander

Incoming General Scott Miller (C), command of US and NATO forces in Afghanistan, outgoing U.S. Army General John Nicholson (R) and U.S army General Votel (L) look on during a change of command ceremony at Resolute Support in Kabul on September 2, 2018. - General Scott Miller took command of US and NATO forces in Afghanistan on September 2, as worsening violence erodes hopes for peace in the war-torn country. (Photo by WAKIL KOHSAR / AFP)WAKIL KOHSAR/AFP/Getty Images

By Mujib Mashal

General John Nicholson Jr. spent 31 months at the helm of a quagmire of a mission that has cast a shadow on a generation of US military leaders.

After deadly raid, Pentagon weighs withdrawing almost all commandos from Niger

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is weighing a shift in the Pentagon’s strategy.

By Thomas Gibbons-Neff and Eric Schmitt

If approved, the plan would also close military outposts in Tunisia, Cameroon, Libya, and Kenya, as well as seven of the eight US elite counterterrorism units in Africa.

Pope Francis’ accuser turns up the pressure with more claims

Archbishop Viganò wrote on Friday: “What is certain is that the pope knew very well who [Kim Davis] was.”

By Jason Horowitz

Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò gave his version of events leading up to the pope’s 2015 meeting with the Kentucky clerk who refused to issue same-sex marriage licenses.

Editorial & Opinion

Editorial

Labor Day 2038: Will you have a job or be replaced by a robot?

Workers have a lot to celebrate this Labor Day, but these victories may seem quaint.

RENÉE LOTH

The joy of voting

By Renée Loth

What if voting were less a “civic duty” and more a community party?

Alex Beam

In praise of [The People Who No Longer Call Themselves Mormons]

Russell M. Nelson is asking people to refrain from using “Mormon” or “LDS” as a substitute for the religion’s full name: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

By Alex Beam

Before I poke fun at [The People Who No Longer Call Themselves Mormons], let me take a moment to say how much I admire them.

More Stories

Opinion | Richard North Patterson

How Democrats can win

By Richard North Patterson

Opinion | Anne Bernays

Why is soccer such a flop in the US?

By Anne Bernays

Opinion | Niall Ferguson

The warrior spirit hasn’t quite died with John McCain

By Niall Ferguson

Opinion | Ward Sutton

It’s Putin’s party now

By Ward Sutton

Metro

Who gets the better bed? As college freshmen move in, it’s turf war time

Zoe Willig, 18, of Seattle, prepared to hoist a bookcase in her Tufts University dorm room with the help of her stepfather, Jay Kornfeld.

By Beth Teitell

In an age when every aspect of dorm decor and etiquette can be pre-negotiated online, the bed is perhaps the last thing decided in real time.

On speck of land, drug recovery program looks to take root

Kathleen Duseau (right) took part in a retreat by Recovering Champions to Penikese Island Wild Life Sanctuary.

By Brian MacQuarrie

The Penikese Island School wants to build a year-round residential center on an unpopulated island 14 miles from Woods Hole, a refuge for those fighting opioid abuse.

Candidates for governor, US Senate crisscross state in last-minute push before primary

Beth Lindstrom, seeking Elizabeth Warren’s US Senate seat, spent part of Saturday in Saugus waving to drivers on Route 1.

By Joshua Miller and James Pindell

Candidates spent the holiday weekend reminding voters that there’s an election — on Tuesday.

Business & Tech

Under Trump, labor protections stripped away

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 27: Union activists and supporters rally against the Supreme Court's ruling in the Janus v. AFSCME case, in Foley Square in Lower Manhattan, June 27, 2018 in New York City. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday that public employee unions cannot require non-members to pay fees. The ruling will have significant financial impacts for organized labor. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

By Katie Johnston

President Trump and his appointees are steering policy in a decidedly employer-friendly direction.

WORK SPACE

From a private office, she catalogues public lives

Vita Paladino is director of the Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center at Boston University.

By Stephanie Ebbert

BU’s Vita Paladino curates personal collections ranging from Martin Luther King Jr. to Robin Williams to Tom Menino.

With a new Chinese owner, Terrafugia says its flying car is getting closer to takeoff

The Transition D2 prototype uses a runway; Terrafugia is also working on a vehicle that takes off and lands vertically.

By Jon Chesto

Can Terrafugia’s longtime ambition to sell flying cars finally take off?

Obituaries

Randy Weston, 92, pianist whose jazz compositions explored music’s African beginnings

“When the ancient ancestors of Africa touch you, you fall in love with the African culture,” Mr. Weston told the Globe in 2013. The pianist and composer performed often in Boston and held residencies at Harvard University and New England Conserv-atory.

By Globe staff and wire reports

Mr. Weston performed often in Boston and held residencies at Harvard University and New England Conservatory.

James Mirrlees, 82, Nobel laureate in economics who studied taxation

Dr. Mirrlees sought to find a point where government taxation would provide a shared benefit to society without being an onerous burden on individual workers.

By Matt Schudel

Dr. Mirrlees developed a mathematical model to find a point where government taxation would provide a shared benefit to society without being an onerous burden on individual workers.

Sports

tara sullivan

Tiger Woods adds friendship to the bag in round with Bryson DeChambeau

Norton MA 9/2/18 Bryson DeChambeau walking towards the 16th green during the third round of the at Dell Technologies Championship. (photo by Matthew J. Lee/Globe staff) topic: reporter:

By Tara Sullivan

The two chatted throughout the third round at the Dell Technologies Championship at TPC Boston.

Nora Princiotti

Patriots pick up two wide receivers off waivers

Seattle Seahawks' Amara Darboh runs on the field during an NFL football practice Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Renton, Wash. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

By Nora Princiotti

Amara Darboh and Chad Hansen were claimed, giving the Patriots a little more depth — for now.

WHITE SOX 8, RED SOX 0

Red Sox go down without a fight in losing to White Sox

CHICAGO, IL - SEPTEMBER 02: Tim Anderson #7 of the Chicago White Sox gestures as he crosses home plate after hitting a home run against the Boston Red Sox during the first inning on September 2, 2018 at Guaranteed Rate Field in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by David Banks/Getty Images)

By Peter Abraham

Lowly Chicago earned a split of the four-game series by routing the listless Red Sox in Sunday’s finale.