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Providence, R.I. -01/15/19 Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo rehearses the annual state of the state address in the House of Representatives at the Rhode Island State House where it will be delivered. Photo by John Tlumacki/Globe Staff(metro)

John Tlumacki/Globe Staff

She didn’t win big. But Raimondo’s reelection signals continuity amid rocky Rhode Island politics

Building on success in her first term, Governor Gina Raimondo is keeping her focus on education and the economy as her second term begins.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2019/01/27/BostonGlobe.com/National/Images/ec3ff74aa0ae4e0794705109de76d690-ec3ff74aa0ae4e0794705109de76d690-0.jpg After shutdown, return to normalcy still distant

An avalanche of e-mails, backlogged permits, lapsed contracts, and stalled payments to low-income Americans will face the hundreds of thousands of federal employees who return to work Monday.

Opioid company executives set to go on trial in Boston Monday

In a landmark case, federal prosecutors allege Insys Therapeutics officials enticed doctors to illegally prescribe a brand of fentanyl, a powerful and addictive opioid.

Mary Jordan-Roy, chief of staff for Representative James M. Murphy, met with various students, including Michaela McCormack, 18, (second from left), at the State House on Sexual Health Lobby Day earlier this month.

Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff

In Mass. and beyond, an effort to bolster access to abortion

It also would create safe havens of services for women from nearby states that are trying to impose restrictions.

The Nation

After shutdown, return to normalcy still distant

Park ranger Rhonda Schier welcomed visitors to the Gateway Arch in St. Louis on Sunday, the day of its reopening.

By Lisa Rein and Juliet Eilperin

An avalanche of e-mails, backlogged permits, lapsed contracts, and stalled payments to low-income Americans will face the hundreds of thousands of federal employees who return to work Monday.

Stone says text exchanges cited in indictment were mischaracterized

Leading a dog, an FBI agent leaves Roger Stone's apartment building in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan on Friday morning, Jan. 25, 2019. Stone, a longtime informal adviser to President Donald Trump, was charged as part of the special counsel investigation over his communications with WikiLeaks, the organization behind the release of thousands of stolen Democratic emails during the 2016 campaign, in an indictment unsealed Friday, Jan. 25, 2019. (Jeenah Moon/The New York Times)

Roger Stone, a longtime adviser to President Trump, said that he would prove his innocence in the case brought against him by the special counsel.

Trump rollbacks for fossil fuel industries carry steep cost

In 2014, CSX tanker cars carrying crude oil derailed and caught fire along the James River near in Lynchburg, Va. An analysis finds that a Trump administration rollback of environmental and safety rules for the US energy sector carries health and safety risks, including more derailments of trains carrying explosive fuels.

By Matthew Brown

Government projections show that the billions of dollars in savings reaped by companies will come at the expense of more premature deaths and illnesses from air pollution, a jump in climate-warming emissions, and more severe derailments of trains carrying explosive fuels.

The World

Afghan women fear peace with Taliban may mean war on them

By Rod Nordland, Fatima Faizi and Fahim Abed

When Rahima Jami heard that the Americans and the Taliban were close to a peace deal, she thought about her feet.

Venezuela’s opposition in talks with military officials to force out Maduro, its leader says

Juan Guaido, president of the National Assembly of Venezuela, speaks during a rally Saturday in Caracas. MUST CREDIT: Carlos Becerra, Bloomberg

By Andreina Aponte and Anthony Faiola

The Venezuelan opposition is in talks with sympathetic military and civilian officials in a bid to force out President Nicolás Maduro, self-proclaimed interim president Juan Guaido said in an interview Sunday with The Washington Post.

Bombing at Philippines cathedral kills 20, wounds scores

In this Philippine military photo, a soldier viewed the Roman Catholic cathedral in Jolo after Sunday’s bombing.

By Jason Gutierrez

Two bombs exploded at a cathedral in the southern Philippines on Sunday, killing 20 people and wounding scores of others, officials said.

Editorial & Opinion

EDITORIAL

Charlie Baker refiles bill to fix criminal justice loophole

A Supreme Judicial Court ruling in a statutory rape case provides an opening for a new law on pretrial detention for those deemed a danger to the community.

Opinion | Q&A

It’s a dangerous time for Venezuela

TOPSHOT - Venezuelans opposed to President Nicolas Maduro hold a demonstration in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico in support of opposition leader Juan Guaido's self-proclamation as acting president of Venezuela, on January 23, 2019. (Photo by Guillermo Arias / AFP)GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images

By Aimee Ortiz

According to Ricardo Hausmann, Venezuela’s former minister of planning and former chief economist of the Inter-American Development Bank, there’s also reason for cautious optimism.

Alex Beam

Errol Morris’s ‘American Dharma’ dances with the devil that is Steve Bannon

Steve Bannon in the documentary American Dharma.

By Alex Beam

Morris’s documentary on Steve Bannon is being widely shunned because of its subject. But shouldn’t we want to know more about Steve Bannon, not less?

Metro

In Mass. and beyond, an effort to bolster access to abortion

Mary Jordan-Roy, chief of staff for Representative James M. Murphy, met with various students, including Michaela McCormack, 18, (second from left), at the State House on Sexual Health Lobby Day earlier this month.

By Stephanie Ebbert

It also would create safe havens of services for women from nearby states that are trying to impose restrictions.

MBTA overtime spending spiked last year

The MBTA paid more overtime pay to workers last year than it has in several years.

By Matt Rocheleau

The T spent more on overtime last year than it did in 2015, when record-breaking snowfall drove up the agency’s labor costs.

NESTOR RAMOS

In Quincy, hit by opioid crisis, treatment van cuts hours, putting recoveries at risk

Opioid recovery patients waited in their cars in Quincy earlier this month for a mobile methadone clinic van to open. The van no longer serves people on weekends.

By Nestor Ramos

Habit Opco, a private health care provider that runs several methadone clinics, late last year stopped offering its mobile service on Saturdays and Sundays, creating logistical challenges for patients.

Business & Tech

INNOVATION ECONOMY

Everyday virtual reality? Developers at this MIT event had some ideas for the future

To many people, virtual reality technology remains more of a novelty than necessity. For example, viewers used it to witness the launch of the 2020 Ford Mustang at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit earlier this month.

By Scott Kirsner

At an MIT event, applications included language learning, a “virtual cane,” and physical therapy.

Opioid company executives set to go on trial in Boston Monday

Insys Therapeutics founder John Kapoor faces up to 20 years in prison if convicted of racketeering conspiracy.

By Jonathan Saltzman and Maria Cramer

In a landmark case, federal prosecutors allege Insys Therapeutics officials enticed doctors to illegally prescribe a brand of fentanyl, a powerful and addictive opioid.

WORK SPACE

A doctor’s office without a diploma in sight

Dr. Alice Flaherty was bathed in magenta grow light in her office at Mass. General.

By Liz Kowalczyk

At Mass. General, Alice Flaherty’s interior design is shaped by her experience with bipolar illness.

Obituaries

Steven B. Dodge, a successful entrepreneur in four fields, dies at 73

Steven B. Dodge’s final act was as a real estate developer with a major presence on the North Shore.

By Bryan Marquard

Mr. Dodge excelled in the cable TV, radio, cell towers, and real estate development fields.

Fatima Ali, fan favorite on ‘Top Chef,’ dies at 29

Ms. Ali was the youngest executive sous chef at Stella 34 Trattoria at the Macy’s in NYC’s Herald Square.

By Jeffery C. Mays

While her season of the reality culinary competition show was airing, Ms. Ali announced in 2017 that she had Ewing’s sarcoma, which affects bone and soft tissue.

Nicola L, whose feminist art had a useful side, has died

By Roberta Smith

The French pop artist was best known for wry feminist sculpture of female and male forms that often function as furniture.

Sports

Rams fans in Los Angeles get reward after long wait

The Rams made the Super Bowl in just their third season back in Los Angeles.

By Julian Benbow

When Rams owner Georgia Frontiere moved the team halfway across the country for the 1995 season, she created a void in LA.

Thousands of fans turn out at Gillette Stadium to send Patriots off to Super Bowl 53

Confetti flies at the conclusion of the Patriots’ send-off rally at Gillette Stadium.

By Nate Weitzer

As many as 35,000 fans were in Foxborough on a sunny and cold Sunday morning to send their team to Atlanta.

GARY WASHBURN

A long-lost Rams fan has a team to root for again

A young Gary Washburn was proudly wearing a Rams jacket when he met quarterback James Harris in 1977.

By Gary Washburn

The Globe’s Gary Washburn grew up in LA as a big Rams fan. With the team safely ensconced back in his hometown and headed to the Super Bowl, the circle is complete.

More Stories

MSTCA COACHES INVITATIONAL | SMALL SCHOOLS

Milton’s Smith Charles and Medway’s Ava Vasile are stars of show

By Matt Doherty

BOYS’ BASKETBALL | MANSFIELD 74, LYNN ENGLISH 64

Mansfield takes charge, downs Lynn English in boys’ basketball

By Nate Weitzer

HIGH SCHOOL NOTEBOOK

Boys’ gymnastics programs not always given their due

By Matt MacCormack

kevin paul dupont | on hockey

Long break could be a boon or a bust for Bruins

By Kevin Paul Dupont

Patriots touch down in Atlanta

By Rachel G. Bowers