Front page

When Robert Indiana (top, in 2013) died in 2018, he left behind his ramshackle residence, the Star of Hope, as well as numerous works of art.

Lauren Casselberry/associated press/file

In wake of famed artist Robert Indiana’s death, a tangle of allegations

The artist’s estate is snared in allegations involving fraud, forgery, theft, and elder abuse.

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2019/02/06/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/Eightmanfootball07.jpg As football loses luster, smaller teams take hold in Maine

Maine is poised to become the only New England state to field high school football teams with eight players instead of 11.

Dan Geldon is Elizabeth Warren’s secret weapon

Dan Geldon, chief of staff for Warren’s presidential campaign, will greatly influence her political prospects in the months ahead.

A newer single room at Mass. General, which is seeking approval to build two connected towers with 450 private rooms, at a cost of more than $1 billion.

David L. Ryan/Globe Staff

Patients want private rooms, and hospitals are accommodating them

MGH is joining a growing number of US medical centers that are constructing private rooms, often at significant cost, to give patients and caregivers more privacy.

The Nation

Trump’s move to bypass Congress leaves Republican senators in a bind

President Trump’s emergency declaration left Senate Republicans sharply divided.

By Carl Hulse

The resistance to Trump’s emergency declaration was much more pronounced in the Senate than in the House.

Analysis

In declaring a national emergency, Trump reminds Republicans: It’s all about him

Declaring a national emergency to fund his border wall, the president reminded Republican lawmakers that he will feel free to trample on them whenever it suits him.

By Dan Balz

Though he expects loyalty from Republicans, President Trump has never demonstrated much fidelity to the party that he leads, and Friday he proved it again.

Dan Geldon is Elizabeth Warren’s secret weapon

Some dismiss Dan Geldon (left) as inexperienced, wonky, arrogant. But there’s no denying he’s part of Senator Elizabeth Warren’s rise from a Harvard law professor to a top tier candidate for the highest office in the land.

By Jess Bidgood and Victoria McGrane

Dan Geldon, chief of staff for Warren’s presidential campaign, will greatly influence her political prospects in the months ahead.

The World

Pence urges EU to denounce Maduro and recognize Guaidó as Venezuela’s leader

Vice President Mike Pence urged the European Union to denounce Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro on Saturday.

By Anne Gearan

Major European countries have followed the lead of the United States in recognizing Juan Guaidó, but the European Union as an institution has not.

Critical of United States, a spying suspect drifted to Iran

Officials said damage from Monica Witt’s case to US security was severe.

By Alan Blinder, Julie Turkewitz and Adam Goldman

Officials said damage from Monica Witt’s case to US security was severe.

Lipstick in kindergarten? South Korea’s K-beauty industry now aims for super young

A young girl applied lipstick made for children at PriPara Kids Cafe in Yongin, South Korea.

By Min Joo Kim and Simon Denyer

South Korea’s cosmetics industry has become an Asian powerhouse and global phenomenon for its rigorous step-by-step regimens.

More Stories

Nigeria’s candidates blame each other in surprise vote delay

By Hilary Uguru, Cara Anna and Rodney Muhumuza

Editorial & Opinion

Ediitorial

Time for a reset on education funding

Boston, MA - 4/6/2017 - Massachusetts State Senator Jason Lewis sits for a portrait in his office at the State House in Boston, MA, April 6, 2017. (Keith Bedford/Globe Staff)

Compromise is needed to get to yes on education funding.

Renée Graham

White women: from slave owners to Trump voters

President Donald Trump speaks at the Major County Sheriffs and Major Cities Chiefs Association Joint Conference in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

By Renée Graham

A new book details white women’s critical role in normalizing slavery. Many continue to embrace those values 154 years later.

Michael A. Cohen

President Trump’s national emergency threatens democracy

President Donald Trump speaks during an event in the Rose Garden at the White House to declare a national emergency in order to build a wall along the southern border, Friday, Feb. 15, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

By Michael A. Cohen

There’s no crisis at the border, but there is a democratic crisis within the GOP.

Metro

As football loses luster, smaller teams take hold in Maine

Flanked by football players Peter Coleman, left and Kobe Weinstein, right, Old Orchard Beach Football Coach Dean Plante spoke about changes coming to football here next fall.

By Brian MacQuarrie

Maine is poised to become the only New England state to field high school football teams with eight players instead of 11.

In wake of famed artist Robert Indiana’s death, a tangle of allegations

When Robert Indiana (top, in 2013) died in 2018, he left behind his ramshackle residence, the Star of Hope, as well as numerous works of art.

By Mark Shanahan

The artist’s estate is snared in allegations involving fraud, forgery, theft, and elder abuse.

Yvonne Abraham

Big companies don’t need our tax breaks

General Electric’s plan for a bold building along the Fort Point Channel are no more.

By Yvonne Abraham

Are we finally going to see an end to cities and states bowing and scraping and offering massive tax giveaways to attract big corporations?

Sports

BEN VOLIN | SUNDAY FOOTBALL NOTES

Josh McDaniels a big winner at Super Bowl

Josh McDaniels and Tom Brady brainstorm during the Patriots’ victory over the Rams in the Super Bowl.

By Ben Volin

The Patriots offensive coordinator, a pariah in the league a year ago when he backed out of the Colts coaching job, gained redemption.

Bruins notebook

Los Angeles Kings star Zdeno Chara? Yes, it almost happened

Boston Bruins' Zdeno Chara during an NHL hockey game against the Los Angeles Kings Saturday, Feb. 9, 2019, in Boston. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson)

By Matt Porter

The defenseman is in his 13th season as Bruins captain, second only to Ray Bourque (15) in tenure.

NBA ALL-STAR WEEKEND NOTEBOOK

Kyrie Irving insists big picture all that matters

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA - FEBRUARY 15: Kyrie Irving looks on during the 2019 Mtn Dew ICE Rising Stars at Spectrum Center on February 15, 2019 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

By Gary Washburn

The Celtics leader admits there was some truth in Marcus Morris’ critical comments, but devalues outside assessments.

More Stories

KEVIN PAUL DUPONT I SUNDAY HOCKEY NOTES

NHL trade deadline deals don’t come cheap

By Kevin Paul Dupont

MIAA GIRLS’ SWIMMING & DIVING CHAMPIONSHIPS

Wayland holds off Duxbury to capture Division 2 crown

By Matt MacCormack

MIAA DIVISION 3 INDOOR TRACK & FIELD CHAMPIONSHIP

Walpole boys, Hingham girls capture state titles

By Alex Bensley

Kevin Paul Dupont | On Second Thought

One small golf tip lands Matt Kuchar in deep rough

By Kevin Paul Dupont

RED SOX SPRING TRAINING REPORT

Saturday’s spring training report: Pitcher fielding drills continue

By Peter Abraham

GARY WASHBURN | ON BASKETBALL

Anthony Davis restokes flames on Celtics conjecture

By Gary Washburn

GARY WASHBURN | SUNDAY BASKETBALL NOTES

76ers believe they finally have the right mix

By Gary Washburn

NICK CAFARDO I SUNDAY BASEBALL NOTES

Tampa Bay Rays aren’t willing to concede AL East to Red Sox and Yankees

By Nick Cafardo

Ideas

Ideas | Tina Cassidy

White women skewing conservative is a decades-long trend, but their power may be waning

1915: From left to right, Mrs James Leeds Laidlaw, Mrs Albert Plimpton, Mrs A Hughston, Mrs Frank Stratton and Helen Rich lead the Manhattan Delegation on a Woman Suffrage Party parade through New York. (Photo by Paul Thompson/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

By Tina Cassidy

For 100 years, the predominantly male political machine has been wrestling with that question. Now, women may finally get to answer it themselves.

Ideas | Michael Rezendes

With so much of its leadership compromised, is the Catholic Church irredeemable?

VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - AUGUST 31: St. Peter's Basilica stands in Rome on August 31, 2018 in Vatican City, Vatican. Tensions in the Vatican are high following accusations that Pope Francis covered up for an American ex-cardinal accused of sexual misconduct. Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, a member of the conservative movement in the church, made the allegations and has called for the pontiff to resign. Many Vatican insiders see the dispute as an outgrowth of the growing tension between the left leaning Pope and the more conservative and anti-homosexual faction of the Catholic Church. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

By Michael Rezendes

The sexual abuse crisis has become the scandal that never ends. If the church can’t address it, a revolt of the laity — or even a schism in the church itself — could be coming.

Ideas | Aimee Ortiz

Why the FBI investigated Isaac Asimov

Author Isaac Asimov autographs books at the Mysterious Book Store stall on February 2, 1984 during the Fifth Avenue Book Fair held in New York City, United States. The 64-year-old science fiction writer will publish his 300th book in 1984. (AP Photo/Mario Suriani)

By Aimee Ortiz

Scientists know things. Important things. And for years, that’s terrified the FBI.

More Stories

IDEAS | BETH WOLFENSBERGER SINGER

The emojis we really need

By Beth Wolfensberger Singer

Brainiac

On Second Thought: No take-backs

By Adam Marcus

Obituaries

Bruno Ganz, 77, Swiss actor who starred in ‘Downfall’

Most of actor Bruno Ganz’s work was in German-language films but he did appear in several American movies.

By Anita Gates

The melancholy Swiss film actor played an angel longing for the visceral joys of mortality in “Wings of Desire” and a defeated Hitler with trembling hands facing his own mortality in “Downfall.”

Mel A. Tomlinson, 65, ballet star and ‘Agon’ interpreter

By Gia Kourlas

Mr. Tomlinson was one of the few performers to star with three major companies — Dance Theater of Harlem, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, and New York City Ballet.

A. Ernest Fitzgerald, 92, exposer of Pentagon waste

By Richard Sandomir

The tenacious Air Force cost expert was fired after testifying to Congress in 1968 that a new fleet of aircraft had soared $2 billion over budget.

Sunday Arts

Art Review

The Gardner, Botticelli, and #MeToo

Botticelli’s “The Story of Lucretia” on view in the Gardner Museum’s new exhibit, “Heroines + Heroes.”

By Murray Whyte

The museum asks some hard questions in its historic display of a revered old master.

The Oscars: Who’ll win, who should win, who shouldn’t

By Ty Burr and Janice Page

Ty Burr and Janice Page offer their Oscar picks.

Bibliophiles

For author Amitava Kumar, a desire to find big ideas in small packages leads to a push for novellas

Amitava Kumar

By Amy Sutherland

Kumar’s most recent book is 2018’s “Immigrant, Montana.’’

More Stories

book review

The times they aren’t a-changin’ fast enough

By Rebecca Steinitz

BUZZSAW | Matthew Gilbert

Why ‘Russian Doll’ may be the best show of 2019

By Matthew Gilbert

It’s a Thing

Undying love, proprietary moves, top dogs, and more

By Michael Andor Brodeur

@Large | Michael Andor Brodeur

In loving memory of the third person

By Michael Andor Brodeur

the story behind the book

My mom, queen of the numbers

By Kate Tuttle

Scene Here | Local films, festivals, and faces

Keeping score, with ‘Diva’ and ‘Metropolis

By Loren King

Travel

Madly in love: The surreal love nests of Salvador and Gala Dalí

Walking around in the Dalí Theatre-Museum in Figueres is a little like rummaging through the back rooms of Salvador Dalí's brain.

By Patricia Harris and David Lyon

This tiny seaside village at the end of a twisting mountain drive is among the most improbable love nests of the mid-20th century.

Want love that lasts? Honeymoon Island has serious street cred. And rattlesnakes.

Whether for a day trip, a vacation, or a wedding on the beach, see if there’s love in the air on Florida’s Honeymoon Island.

By Diane Bair and Pamela Wright

It was the home of the first reality show, in 1940.

Starting down the trail together

Lynn Van Hulse and Butch Beck from Arizona hiked a trail in west-central Vermont.

By Patricia Harris and David Lyon

Hiking honeymoons get some marriages off on the right foot.

Real Estate

Watertown sees development boom, population surge, and jump in housing prices

By Katheleen Conti

It wasn’t too long ago that Watertown, with its old housing stock, underwhelming mall, and lack of subway service, was not on the map for many home buyers. | realestate.boston.com

Home of the Week: Post-and-beam home with a contemporary twist for $899,000

By John R. Ellement

Five-bedroom Chelmsford home undergoes renovation, features marble, porcelain, timber, and hardwood. | realestate.boston.com

When is the best time to repave your driveway?

By Rob Robillard

Ask the Carpenter’s Rob Robillard also weighs in on duct cleaning. Get more expert advice at realestate.boston.com.

Globe Local

ARLINGTON

Estimated cost of new Arlington High School lowered to $291 million

The estimated cost of building a new Arlington High School is now $291 million, according to a town panel.

By John Laidler

An Arlington panel recently agreed to a $291 million estimated price for the town’s proposed new high school, a $17 million reduction from the original estimate.

NEWTON

Newton considers tightening shopping bag regulations

By John Hilliard

Disposable plastic bags would be eliminated at city retail establishments, and customers would be charged a fee to use a paper or reusable bag.

Medway school food pantry provides weekend sustenance

By Ysabelle Kempe

On Friday afternoons, a Medway elementary school will send 15 children home with a backpack full of food for over the weekend.