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campaign notebook

Capuano to back ‘progressive’ Walsh

The nod from Michael Capuano, a former Somerville mayor and one of the most liberal Democratic members of Congress, could be a boon to Martin Walsh’s progressive bona fides.

Aram Boghosian for the Globe/File

The nod from Michael Capuano, a former Somerville mayor and one of the most liberal Democratic members of Congress, could be a boon to Martin Walsh’s progressive bona fides.

US Representative Michael E. Capuano, whose district includes a wide swath of Boston, is set to endorse mayoral candidate Martin J. Walsh on Monday, according to advisers to Capuano and Walsh.

The nod from Capuano, a former Somerville mayor and one of the most liberal Democratic members of Congress, could be a boon to Walsh’s progressive bona fides and will boost his already hefty roster of endorsements from other elected officials.

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“Congressman Capuano believes that Marty’s life history and his career, filled with helping those in need, uniquely positions Marty Walsh as mayor to be a powerful progressive voice for Boston,” said the Capuano adviser, Paul Trane.

Michael Goldman, a senior adviser to Walsh, confirmed the endorsement and said it was set to be announced at a 10 a.m. event in Hyde Park.

Walsh, a longtime state representative, has gained the backing of a variety of Boston elected officials in recent weeks, including city councilors, state legislators, and former mayoral rivals.

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US Representative Stephen F. Lynch, whose district includes the rest of Boston, is also backing Walsh.

Walsh and Councilor at Large John R. Connolly, who has picked up some endorsements of his own from elected officials, emerged from a 12-candidate field in the September preliminary election to succeed Mayor Thomas M. Menino. In just over two weeks, on Nov. 5, Boston voters will choose between the two finalists.

JOSHUA MILLER

Mayoral rivals tally support from city’s minority leaders

City Councilor Tito Jackson led Saturday morning’s enthusiastic cheer: “When I say Marty, you say . . . ” On cue, more than a dozen local elected officials and community leaders responded: “Walsh!”

The enthusiastic gathering in Grove Hall was the latest in a series of endorsements won by state Representative Martin J. Walsh, who is competing against City Councilor John R. Connolly to become Boston’s next mayor.

Among those who endorsed Walsh on Saturday were several of the city’s most prominent elected officials of color: Jackson, state Senator Sonia Chang-Diaz, and state Representatives Carlos Henriquez, Gloria Fox, and Russell Holmes.

“He’s going to be the one to listen to my community, and my community is Roxbury,” Fox declared. “I can believe him, I can trust him. So I’m here to encourage each and every one of you to go the distance with us.”

Also in attendance were City Councilor Felix G. Arroyo and former state representative Charlotte Golar Richie — mayoral contenders who have thrown their support behind Walsh — as well as state Senator Linda Dorcena Forry and state Representative Dan Cullinane, a former Walsh aide.

Both campaigns have competed for backing in Boston’s minority communities, which could be vital in the Nov 5. election.

While both Walsh and Connolly can boast the backing of prominent community leaders and ministers of color, Walsh has secured near-unilateral backing from minority lawmakers.

WESLEY LOWERY

Joshua Miller can be reached at joshua.miller@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @jm_bos. Wesley Lowery can be reached at wesley.lowery@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @WesleyLowery.
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