Metro
    Next Score View the next score

    Walsh goes on vacation, forgets to tell City Council

    Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh forgot to notify the City Council he was going on vacation and would be outside the city.
    Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff/File 2013
    Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh forgot to notify the City Council he was going on vacation and would be outside the city.

    Mayor Martin J. Walsh left at the beginning of the week for Cape Cod and forgot something important. It wasn’t his toothbrush. He didn’t leave the iron on at home.

    Walsh forgot to properly notify the City Council of his absence from Boston, which is required by law.

    “This was simply an oversight that we have fixed immediately,” press secretary Kate Norton said. “The mayor has been in constant contact with staff, and, thanks to modern technology, he continues to serve as the leader of the City of Boston.”

    Advertisement

    The city code stipulates that the mayor must “inform the City Council president of any absence . . . [and] provide the date of his departure from Boston and the date of his return.”

    Get Fast Forward in your inbox:
    Forget yesterday's news. Get what you need today in this early-morning email.
    Thank you for signing up! Sign up for more newsletters here

    After a reporter inquired, Walsh’s staff filed a letter Friday with the city clerk’s office noting that he would be “out of town intermittently.” He will be on the Cape for two weeks but plans to make several trips to Boston to perform his duties, Norton said.

    “In our last conversation, he did mention he was going to the Cape,” City Council President Bill Linehan said, “but I didn’t receive the usual [written] notification.”

    The law actually requires the mayor to give notification any time he leaves the city. Does that include a trip for dinner at South Shore Plaza in Braintree? Or a visit to Camp Harbor View on Long Island, which requires a drive through Quincy? How about cutting through Brookline to get to Allston?

    “This is another city regulation,” Norton said, “that may require a fresh review and change.”