You can now read 5 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

12-year-old stabbing suspect called not competent

WAUKESHA, Wis. — Doctors believe that one of the two 12-year-old Wisconsin girls accused of stabbing a classmate to please a fictional character is not mentally competent to stand trial, lawyers said Wednesday.

The prosecution immediately requested a hearing to discuss the conclusions, which assess whether the girl is capable of assisting in her own defense. One of the psychologists was hired by the defense and the other is a state-appointed doctor.

Continue reading below

Prosecutors also asked that the girl be given a separate evaluation to determine whether she had mental disease at the moment the crime was committed. The move suggests they are preparing for a possible insanity plea.

Waukesha County Judge Michael Bohren granted both requests and set the hearings for Aug. 1.

The girl, who according to the criminal complaint told police she stabbed the victim some 17 times, appeared in court separately from her co-defendant. Each wore blue prison garb and shuffled along slowly, their heads bowed and their cuffed hands clasped in front of them.

Prosecutors say the girls plotted for months to kill their 12-year-old friend to curry favor with the popular online specter known as Slender Man.

They lured her to a park west of Milwaukee on May 31 and stabbed her 19 times in the arms, legs, and torso, authorities said.

Doctors told police the knife narrowly missed a major artery near the victim’s heart. The child has since been released from a hospital and is recovering at home.

The two girls are charged in adult court with being party to attempted first-degree intentional homicide.

The Associated Press is not naming them while there is a chance their cases will be sent to juvenile court — the ultimate goal of both defense attorneys.

Wisconsin law says no defendant who is mentally incompetent may be tried, convicted, or sentenced. So that issue is a significant factor in whether court proceedings continue.

Loading comments...
Subscriber Log In

We hope you've enjoyed your 5 free articles'

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Already a subscriber?
Your city. Your stories. Your Globe.
Yours FREE for two weeks.
Enjoy free unlimited access to Globe.com for the next two weeks.
Limited time only - No credit card required!
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.
Thanks & Welcome to Globe.com
You now have unlimited access for the next two weeks.
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.