Yankees pitcher Michael Pineda was ejected in the second inning after umpires discovered pine tar on his neck.

Elise Amendola/Associated Press

Yankees pitcher Michael Pineda was ejected in the second inning after umpires discovered pine tar on his neck.

Red Sox manager John Farrell had complained about Pineda.

Barry Chin/Globe Staff

Red Sox manager John Farrell had complained about Pineda.

The Yankees starter showed his pitching hand to Davis.

Jared Wickerham/Getty Images

Pineda showed his pitching hand to umpire Gerry Davis.

Home plate umpire Gerry Davis inspected the back and neck of Pineda.

Jared Wickerham/Getty Images

Davis inspected the back and neck of Pineda.

Davis found the substance on the right side of the pitcher’s neck.

CJ Gunther/EPA

Davis found the substance on the right side of the pitcher’s neck.

Davis tested the substance between his fingers.

Barry Chin/Globe Staff

Davis tested the substance between his fingers.

Pineda was ejected by plate umpire Gerry Davis.

Barry Chin/globe Staff

The umpire was convinced that Pineda was using pine tar so he ejected the pitcher.

“I think we’re all embarrassed,” Yankees GM Brian Cashman said.

Jared Wickerham/Getty Images

“I think we’re all embarrassed,” Yankees GM Brian Cashman said.

Christopher L. Gasper

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2014/04/24/BostonGlobe.com/Sports/Images/gasper.png Foolish mistake by Michael Pineda

Pineda’s crime isn’t using pine tar, it’s using it so blatantly that the Red Sox were forced to say something.

Red Sox 5, Yankees 1

John Lackey leads Red Sox past Yankees

Lackey worked eight innings of one-run ball and shined in a game where the talk was about the ejection of Yankees starter Michael Pineda.

On Baseball

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2014/04/24/BostonGlobe.com/Sports/Images/486300139[1]--90x90.jpg Yankees ‘embarrassed’ by ejection

“I would want my manager to do what John Farrell did,” GM Brian Cashman said Wednesday night.

After an alleged assault in Allston, a selfless rescuer

A woman in her 20s threw herself on a helpless victim who was allegedly being beaten by two former college football players.

In portrait of late artist Jon Imber, life and love endure

A film chronicles the family life and late creative flowering of a renowned Somerville artist diagnosed with ALS.

E-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that heat up nicotine-laced liquid, turning it into a vapor the user inhales.

FDA looks to regulate electronic cigarettes

The move would begin to place restrictions on the nearly $2 billion a year e-cigarette industry.

Watertown safari company accused of exploitation

A lawsuit claims Thomson Safaris illegally obtained land in Tanzania, beat villagers, and burned down homes — charges it denies.

Opinion

JOAN VENNOCHI

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2014/04/24/BostonGlobe.com/EditorialOpinion/Images/vennochi.jpg More candor please, Senator Warren

Senator Elizabeth Warren’s continued refusal to acknowledge the significance of identifying herself as a minority as a law professor is disingenuous.

Lifestyle

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Nawal Ilyas, 27, works on core and balance in an exercise class at Equinox health club in the Back Bay.

Balance training moves to high-end gyms

Stability used to be something only the elderly worried about. But now, athletes of all ages are working on balance to improve performance.

Globe Insiders

From the archives

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2014/04/21/BostonGlobe.com/Lifestyle/Images/oldnorthchurch001-2066.jpg The Old North Church

Boston’s oldest church structure is where Paul Revere told patriots to hang two lanterns that warned of the impending British occupation.