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RECIPES

Recipe: Any cook will be delighted to receive extra-large frozen chicken stock cubes in silicone ice trays

Frozen Chicken Stock CubesKaroline Boehm Goodnick for The Boston Globe

Makes 6 cups or 12 extra-large cubes

Chicken stock is the base for so many delicious soups that a jar of it -- or extra-large ice cubes packed in the silicone tray they were frozen in -- makes a fabulous edible gift for the holidays. To speed things up in the kitchen, make the stock in an electric or stove-top pressure cooker (all of the multi-cookers have this setting). The richest stock is made with chicken wings, necks, and backs. Combine all of the ingredients in the pressure cooker, seal, cook, and let the pressure come down naturally before opening. Then cool, strain, and pour into jars or ice cube trays. Not much effort here for a really fine gift. Large silicone ice cube trays, popular for cocktails, make a great delivery vehicle for the frozen stock. Freeze them till solid, cover, and tie the tray in a plastic bag. Drop it off at the door of someone who could use a timesaver right now.

2pounds chicken bones (wings, necks, backbones)
1medium onion, unpeeled, root removed, halved
2medium carrots, cut into 4 pieces each
2ribs celery, cut into 4 pieces each
1 bay leaf
5 black peppercorns
teaspoons salt
2sprigs fresh thyme
1cup white wine
6cups cold water

1. In an electric or stove-top pressure cooker, combine the chicken bones, onion, carrots, celery, bay leaf, peppercorns, salt, thyme, wine, and water.

2. Close and seal the pot. For multi-cooker pots, cook on high pressure for 40 minutes. For stove-top pots, bring the pressure up, lower the heat, and cook for 20 minutes. For either one, let the pressure drop naturally before unlatching the pot, following the manufacturer's instructions.

3. With a spider or a slotted spoon, remove the meat and vegetables; discard (all flavor will be out of them after cooking). Strain the stock through a fine mesh strainer into a bowl. Leave to cool and refrigerate. Discard the fat that solidifies on the surface of the stock. Pour the stock into jars or ice cube trays and freeze.

Karoline Boehm Goodnick

Makes 6 cups or 12 extra-large cubes

Chicken stock is the base for so many delicious soups that a jar of it -- or extra-large ice cubes packed in the silicone tray they were frozen in -- makes a fabulous edible gift for the holidays. To speed things up in the kitchen, make the stock in an electric or stove-top pressure cooker (all of the multi-cookers have this setting). The richest stock is made with chicken wings, necks, and backs. Combine all of the ingredients in the pressure cooker, seal, cook, and let the pressure come down naturally before opening. Then cool, strain, and pour into jars or ice cube trays. Not much effort here for a really fine gift. Large silicone ice cube trays, popular for cocktails, make a great delivery vehicle for the frozen stock. Freeze them till solid, cover, and tie the tray in a plastic bag. Drop it off at the door of someone who could use a timesaver right now.

2pounds chicken bones (wings, necks, backbones)
1medium onion, unpeeled, root removed, halved
2medium carrots, cut into 4 pieces each
2ribs celery, cut into 4 pieces each
1 bay leaf
5 black peppercorns
teaspoons salt
2sprigs fresh thyme
1cup white wine
6cups cold water

1. In an electric or stove-top pressure cooker, combine the chicken bones, onion, carrots, celery, bay leaf, peppercorns, salt, thyme, wine, and water.

2. Close and seal the pot. For multi-cooker pots, cook on high pressure for 40 minutes. For stove-top pots, bring the pressure up, lower the heat, and cook for 20 minutes. For either one, let the pressure drop naturally before unlatching the pot, following the manufacturer's instructions.

3. With a spider or a slotted spoon, remove the meat and vegetables; discard (all flavor will be out of them after cooking). Strain the stock through a fine mesh strainer into a bowl. Leave to cool and refrigerate. Discard the fat that solidifies on the surface of the stock. Pour the stock into jars or ice cube trays and freeze.Karoline Boehm Goodnick