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Mass. surpasses 16,000 deaths due to COVID-19

The state's death rate is fourth in the country, and despite a recent slowdown in new cases and deaths, it crossed a new threshold Saturday when the state reported 52 new deaths, pushing its toll to 16,044.

Late tip-in helps Providence beat another seeded foe, this time No. 10 Villanova

The Friars nearly squandered a 20-point halftime lead, but went into the Big East tournament on a high.

One arrested for Brockton slaying, second suspect sought

Officials said they obtained arrest warrants charging Takari Elliot, 29, and Marvin Veiga, 32, with murder for the Oct. 13 fatal shooting lof 25-year-old Manuel Duarte on Belmont Avenue.

Boston rally calls for conviction in George Floyd case

The rally in Boston was one of more than a dozen across the country calling for former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin’s conviction in the case, according to organizers.

Robert R. Glauber, Harvard professor who led Black Monday presidential commission, dies at 81

Dr. Glauber was executive director of a commission created to determine the cause of the Oct. 19, 1987, market breakdown.

Charts: Who has been vaccinated in Massachusetts, and how many doses has the state received?

The charts break down vaccination recipients by age, vaccination date, location, and race/ethnicity, while also outlining vaccination brand and administration site type.

The latest COVID-19 numbers from Massachusetts

Here's a look at the latest coronavirus numbers in Massachusetts, including case numbers, deaths, demographics, and more.

Annmarie Reinhart Smith, who battled for retail workers, dies at 61

The lead plaintiff in a class-action lawsuit in bankruptcy court seeking fair compensation, which won $2 million for former Toys R US employees, Annmarie Reinhart Smith was a force for her fellow workers.

More Globe Local Headlines


Story about cat teaches children to ‘stand tall’ against peer pressure

“Nala’s Backyard Adventures: Nala Stands Tall” was written by Despena Zouzas of Chelmsford, with illustrations by Maria Katinas of Watertown.

Quincy literacy program shows that where there’s a will, there’s a way

Despite technological challenges imposed by the pandemic, tutors and students continue one-on-one lessons virtually through the Thomas Crane Public Library.

Wellesley voters back referendum question renaming Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day

The nonbinding question appeared on the ballot for the town’s municipal election, which included candidates for local office.

THE INFORMER

Shipwrecks, Route 9, and a virtual bingo night

Peabody Essex Museum’s upcoming exhibit “Shipwrecks” by artist Alexis Rockman will open to the public on March 6.

Newton

‘Newton Al Fresco’ to bring outdoor dining to city starting April 1

“Newton Al Fresco,” a local program to encourage outdoor dining and help restaurants amid the pandemic, is expected to begin April 1, Mayor Ruthanne Fuller said in a statement.

Thomas Farragher

Devastating fire at Paul Newman’s Hole in the Wall Gang Camp in Connecticut can’t touch its soul

The Feb. 12 fire that tore through the Hole in the Wall Gang Camp destroyed the camp’s wood shop, its camp store, its cooking zone, and its arts & crafts center. But it could never reach the camp’s heart.

‘It is not just about memorizing facts.’ Historians examine how Black History Month was intended to be celebrated

Over time, Black History Month has become a time when topics, such as slavery, Reconstruction and the Civil Rights Era, are tackled in schools and in the media. But that wasn’t what Carter G. Woodson, known as the “Father of Black History,” meant for the time solely to be about.

Forecast | Dave Epstein

Meteorological winter ends this weekend

This means that when we start the next work week, it’s officially spring in a weather person’s handbook

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