The Big Picture

Historic flooding in South Carolina

South Carolina residents face uncertainty as they cope with major flooding after record-settings rains. As many people start the cleanup, others prepare for the threat of floodwaters moving toward the coast. Seventeen people died in the state, and the damage to infrastructure was devastating.--By Leanne Burden Seidel
1
Flooding around Aberdeen Country Club, on Oct. 6 in Longs. S.C.. The Carolinas saw sunshine Tuesday after days of inundation, but it could take weeks to recover from being pummeled by a historic rainstorm that caused widespread flooding and multiple deaths. (Janet Blackmon Morgan/The Sun News via AP)
2
Nasir Linen, 10, holds Tristan Richards, 5, as they ride in the back of a National Guard truck as his family is evacuated from rising flood waters in the Dunbar Community near Georgetown, Oct. 9. A week after the heavy rains first began, some South Carolina residents are still evacuating and others are stacking up sandbags for more possible flooding even as the nation's top security official prepares to inspect the damage firsthand. (Jason Lee/The Sun News via AP)
3
Justin Douglas stands in the doorway of a relatives flooded house on Oct. 7, in Givhans, S.C. The state of South Carolina experienced record rainfall amounts over the weekend and officials expect the damage from the flooding waters to be in the billions of dollars. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
4
Before and after satellite imagery of South Carolina after the flooding in October 2015. The after photo (bottom) was taken on Oct. 6. (Google and DigitalGlobe)
5
A statue and an American flag are seen outside a home flooded by water coming from the breached dams upstream as the water continues to reach areas in the eastern part of the state on Oct. 9 in Andrews. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
6
Tara Saracina paddleboards down her street in the Ashborough subdivision in Summerville, Oct. 8. Saracina said the floodwaters seem to be going down. "Now it's just the cleanup," she said. (Mic Smith/Associated Press)
7
A pickup truck is submerged by an auto parts store along E. Main Street in downtown Kingstree, S.C., Oct. 7. The Black River flooded into parts of Kingstree. (Mic Smith/Associated Press)
8
Justin Lawshe takes a clock from the wall of his father-in-laws house that is flooded by waters being fed from the breached dams upstream as the water continues to reach areas in the eastern part of the state on Oct. 9 in Andrews. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
9
Allen Poston (L) and his nephew, Braxton Blakley, check on his mothers home that is inundated by flood water coming from the breached dams upstream on Oct. 9 in Andrews. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
10
Jordan Fowler (LEFT) and Roy Williamson helps clean up a home in the Gills Creek area Oct. 8, in Columbia. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
11
Chris Murphy sorts through flood-damaged possessions from his parents' home in the Forest Acres neighborhood Oct.7, in Columbia. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
12
Sarah Brennecke and Claire Taylor dry out flood-damaged possessions in Taylor's front yard Oct. 7, in Columbia. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
13
Flooding around homes in the Carolina Forest community in Horry County, between Conway and Myrtle Beach, S.C. The Carolinas saw sunshine Tuesday after days of inundation, but it could take weeks to recover from being pummeled by a historic rainstorm that caused widespread flooding and multiple deaths. (Janet Blackmon Morgan/The Sun News via AP)
14
Chad Shields uses a kayak to deliver food to his mother, Brenda Shields, after her home was flooded on Oct. 7 in Summerville, S.C. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
15
Gay Miller takes photos of E. Main Street in downtown Kingstree, S.C., Oct. 7, as the Black River floodwaters reflect in the later afternoon light. (Mic Smith/Assoicated Press)
16
Sarah Dillow helps move ostriches from their flooded pen on Oct. 7 in Givhans. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
17
Flood waters cover a road, as parts of the state are inundated on Oct. 7 in Summerville, S.C. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
18
Scott Everett (standing) transports his family on a johnboat along Lee's Landing Circle in Conway, Oct. 7. Rescuers searched early Wednesday for two people missing in floodwaters in South Carolina, while authorities urged residents in hundreds of homes to seek higher ground. (Randall Hill/Reuters)
19
A "keep out" sign is nearly submerged after flooding along the Lynches River on Roundtree Road in Effingham, Oct. 6. (Gerry Broome/Associated Press)
20
Rankin Craig watches as friends and family remove belongings from her flooded home in Forest Acres in Columbia., Oct. 7. People in the city are beginning cleanup after being pummeled by a historic rainstorm. (Chuck Burton/Associated Press)
21
Leon Youngblood tears up flooring in a flood-damaged house in the Forest Acres neighborhood Oct. 6 in Columbia. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
22
Horry County police officer Jeff Helfinstine patrols the edge of flood waters along Lee's Landing Circle in Conway Oct. 7. Rescuers searched early Wednesday for two people missing in floodwaters in South Carolina, while authorities urged residents in hundreds of homes to seek higher ground. (Randall Hill/Reuters)
23
A search and rescue team member talks with a resident near the Congaree Swamp Oct. 6, in Eastover. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
24
Michael Carroll checks on his dog Bailey on flooded property in Conway, Oct. 6. The Carroll family has been living with several feet of water on their land since Saturday. (Randall Hill/Reuters)
25
Trey McMillian looks over the damage done by flood waters on a road in Eastover on Oct. 6, in Eastover. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
26
Neighbors and friends help clean up a home affected by flood waters in the Forest Acres neighborhood Oct. 5, in Columbia. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
27
Richard Conley looks back at his house in the Ashborough subdivision near Summerville, after evacuating from it for the last time after collecting all the personal items he could, Oct. 5. (Mic Smith/Associated Press)
28
Alex Scroggins stops to help rescue a dog left behind in a flooded home on the Waccamaw River near Conway, Oct. 5. As the showers tapered off , the governor warned communities downstream, near the low-lying coast, that they may still see rising water and to be prepared for more evacuations. (Jason Lee/The Sun News via AP)
29
A man makes his way through floodwaters in the parking lot of The Citadel Beach Club on Isle of Palms, Oct. 5. (Mic Smith/Associated Press)
30
Joe Ziegler, left, Steven Harmer, Alex Sanders, and Alex Scroggins help family and neighbors move a couch from flooding homes on the Waccamaw River near Conway, Oct. 5. (Jason Lee/The Sun News via AP)
31
An oil sheen can be seen of flood waters in a subdivision west of the Ashley river in Charleston, Oct. 5. (Mic Smith/Associated Press)
32
Charlene Stennis takes her son Christian Hoo-Fong from a fireman after being stranded in a vehicle by flood water Oct. 4, in Columbia. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
33
Homes are inundated by flood waters Oct. 4, in Columbia. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
34
Michelle Hohn helps carry a dog that was rescued from the flood waters on Oct. 7 in Summerville. (Joe RaedleGetty Images)
35
People canoe down South Beltline Road on Oct. 6, in Columbia, South Carolina. The state of South Carolina experienced record rainfall amounts over the weekend and officials expect the costs to be in the billions of dollars. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
36
Floodwaters break through a walkway in Columbia on Oct. 5. South Carolina had problems with crumbling roads and bridges and old drinking water systems and dams long before the historic floods of the past week. Now the state faces what will likely be hundreds of millions if not billions of dollars of bills to fix washed out roads and bridges and destroyed dams. (Chuck Burton/Associated Press)
37
Ryan McClain calls for help after stalling his car on Calhoun Street as flood waters rise, Oct. 3 in Charleston. "I'm just trying to get back to my apartment," he said pointing it out less than two blocks away. A flash flood warning was in effect in parts of South Carolina, where authorities shut down the Charleston peninsula to motorists. (Paul Zoeller/The Post And Courier via AP)
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